Report Hate Speech, Request Content Reinstatement Using New Dedicated Web Forms, Microsoft

Microsoft has announced new dedicated report hate speech as well as reconsider and reinstate content web forms.

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Microsoft in its effort to protect customers by prohibiting hate speech and removing such content from its hosted consumer services—today, announced a new dedicated web form for reporting hate speech on any of theri hosted consumer services.

The new form aims to improve the quality and speed of company reviews.

Microsoft report hate speech and content reinstatement request forms

Any content that promotes hatred based on the following can be submitted— "we've never — nor will we ever — permit content that promotes hatred based on:

Age
Disability
Gender
National or ethnic origin
Race
Religion
Sexual orientation/gender identity"

In addition, also launched today is a new multi-service reconsideration web form, where users can requests to reconsider and reinstatement removed content that customers feel was disabled in error. "We will review submissions via this new form, and if appropriate, reinstate the content," stated Microsoft.

Additionally, the company will be including government requests in their semi-annual Content Removal Requests Report that the company publishes at Microsoft Transparency Hub.

For the "notice-and-takedown" for removing prohibited content on their hosted consumer services, the Redmond said will continue.

Beyond these two approaches, Microsoft said they've recently joined major social media and video-sharing firms in support of the European Commission Code of Conduct countering illegal hate speech online.

Resources to help you getting started:

For getting help to recognize misinformation and hate speech online, you can download this resource.

And, for more information on how Microsoft is working to combat offensive content online, read this documentation.

Update 08/28: According to a recent Microsoft study 'Keeping Up with Generation App' nearly four in 10 American teens report that someone bullied them in the digital world in the last year.

The study was conducted by the Washington, D.C.-based National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), and polled 804 teens, ages 13 to 17 in the U.S., as well as 810 American parents of teens in the same age group.

The results clearly point to the need to help young people in this environment. Read full study over here.

About The Author

Deepak Gupta is a IT & Web Consultant. He is the founder and CEO of diTii.com & DIT Technologies, where he's engaged in providing Technology Consultancy, Design and Development of Desktop, Web and Mobile applications using various tools and softwares. Sign-up for the Email for daily updates. Google+ Profile.