Google+ Adds Pan and Zoom for Viewing High-resolution Photos from Desktop

Google+ adds pan and zoom for viewing high-resolution photos from desktop. Explains how Android developers can use the GoogleAuthUtil class, available through Google Play services, to retrieve a string called an "ID Token".

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Google added new pan and zoom feature to photos on the desktop version of its social networking project Google+

"Google+ is full of amazing photos, higher resolution photos will offer more to explore, so, today we're introducing the ability to pan and zoom when viewing photos from your desktop," stated Google's Dave Cohen on a G+ post.

To give these features a try, simply open a large photo in the lightbox, then:

  • use your mouse wheel to zoom in or out
  • click and drag to pan right, left, up or down

The new feature comes after the weeks of launching full-size backups of Android photos.

Google+ adds pan and zoom to desktop version

Now, that Google Play services, available on every compatible device running Android release 2.2 or higher, in a blog post, Google today explains how developes can verify backend calls from their Android apps.

Verifying Back-End Calls from Android Apps with Google Play services

"Most Android apps have some sort of server-side back end, to persist and share data. Even the most basic game needs to remember its players' high scores. When you're building your back end, one problem you have to solve is how the back-end code knows what app it's talking to and who the person using it is," Google wrote.

"You probably have HTTP endpoints for communicating with your client apps, but how can the server-side code be sure who's sending messages to it? After all, anyone can send HTTP POST requests from anywhere; could they impersonate your users if they could guess their identities?"

"It's really user-unfriendly to ask people to type in usernames and passwords on mobile devices. In particular, if someone has installed your app and given it permission to use the Internet and know your identity, they shouldn't be pestered any more," Google adds.

Doing this is a multi-step process, but "Dev can now use the GoogleAuthUtil class, available through Google Play services, to retrieve a string called an "ID Token". You send the token to your back end and your back end can use it to quickly and cheaply verify which app sent it and who was using the app," explains Google.