Crashes and Exceptions Explained in Google Mobile App Analytics for Android and iOS

Google measuring crashes and exceptions report in Mobile App Analytics can help you make better a product, make more money, and use your development resources more efficiently.

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Google Mobile App Analytics v2 SDKs now offers easy-to-implement automated crash and exception measurement for Android and iOS, as well as a host of reporting options to slice the data in context with all of the user engagement, goal completion, and in-app payments data you already know and love.

In a blog post, Google offers tips to help developers get started, and give some pointers:

crashes and exceptions report in Google Mobile App Analytics

Automate crash measurement with just one line of code to implement for Android or iOS. "Now each time your app crashes, the crash will be measured and sent to Google Analytics automatically," Google said.

<bool name="ga_reportUncaughtExceptions">true</bool>
// Enable automatic crash measurement (iOS).
[GAI sharedInstance].trackUncaughtExceptions = YES;

Monitor the stability of your app from version to version by looking at crashes and exceptions by app version in the Crashes & Exceptions report.

"If you are measuring the same app on two different platforms, like Android or iOS, you can break this view down further by selecting Platform as the secondary dimension. To graph crashes for two or more versions over time, you can create advanced segments for each version number, and apply them both to the Crashes and Exceptions report," Google explains.

Find out what crashes are costing you in terms of both user engagement and dollars by using a custom segment.

Google notes, "by using a particular crash or exception as a custom segment, you can see how user engagement and in-app revenue may be impacted by a particular issue or set of issues."

Use custom segments to segment user experience and outcome data by crashes. This gives you some idea of what they might be costing you in users and in dollars.

"To set this up, you'll want to create two custom segments: one that contains all the sessions in which the exception(s) occurred, and another baseline segment that contains all other sessions unaffected by the exception(s). Once created, try applying both segments to your Goals or Ecommerce Overview reports to get a sense of how the exception(s) might affect user outcomes. Or, apply the segments to your Engagement overview report to see how the exception(s) might impact user engagement metrics," explains Google.

crashes by device by using a custom report in Google Mobile App Analytics

Monitor crashes and exception per device to find out where additional testing and bug fixes may be needed. "To see crashes and exceptions by device, create a custom report and use a dimension like Mobile Device Marketing Name, with Crashes and Exceptions as the metric," Google adds.

To get even more detail, add the Exception Description dimension as a secondary dimension.

Measure caught exceptions. "While caught exceptions won't crash your app, they still may be valuable events to measure, especially when they might have an impact on user experience and outcomes," Google writes.

A caught exception is measured in Google Analytics using a custom description. "For instance, if your app normally catches a server timeout exception when requesting user data, it might be useful to measure that caught exception to know how often a user's request is not being fulfilled," explains Google.

Further Google notes, that you should never send personally identifiable data (PII) to Google Analytics. "Raw exception descriptions may contain PII and we don't recommend sending them to Google Analytics for that reason," adds Google.

Also note, that there's a 100 character limit on exception descriptions, "so if you send your own descriptions, be sure to keep them concise."

caught exception is measured in Google Mobile App Analytics using a custom description

Check out the resources to implemt crash and exception measurement in your app: