Chrome 53 Offloads Flash Support in Favor of HTML5

Google ends flash support with Chrome 53 in favor of HTML5--a much lighter, faster tech, speed up page loading and save more battery life.

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Adobe Flash Player for a dlong-time played a pivotal role in the adoption of online video, gaming and animation on the Web—making web a rich, dynamic experience, and shaped the modern set of web standards.

However, now in the modern time, today's sites adopting more new technologies like HTML5, which not only improve security, but also reduce power consumption and offer faster page load times.

Google has just announced that going forward, Chrome 53 browser will de-emphasize Flash in favor of HTML5.

Before this deprecation, back in September last year, Google had made Flash content 'click-to-play' with Chrome 42. Google notes, this had an immediate, positive impact as users reported of improving page load times and battery savings.

Google Chrome 42-Click-to-play Flash

Futher, the company has said that from December 2016, Chrome 55 onwards it will make HTML5 the default experience. However, the site which only support Flash, users will be prompted to enable Flash when they first visit those sites.

Aside from that, "the only change you'll notice is a safer and more power-efficient browsing experience," added Google.

Google says, "today, more than 90% of Flash on the web loads behind the scenes to support things like page analytics. This kind of Flash slows you down, and starting this September, Chrome 53 will begin to block it."

You'll see an improvement in responsiveness and efficiency for many sites.

Update 08/11/2016: Google also has updated the 'Admin console'. Admins now have the option to block users on Chrome devices from ending processes through the Chrome Task Manager.

Update 08/21:

A new developer flag in the Dev and Beta builds of Chrome has shown up, allowing users to turn on personalized suggestions when opening a new tab.

To try it out, just make sure you are on a Dev or Beta build of Chrome. Then, just type in "chrome://flags" in the address bar and toggle the "Show content snippets on New Tab Page" flag.

Once you turn it on, this feature shows a collection of your interests articles, virtually identical to the Google Now cards. Interestingly enough, you also have a number of options to toggle like: the user can turn off the feature entirely, or can use it but skip the personalized results and just see general recommendations that are trending at the moment.

The option is available in the stable build of Chrome on Android as well, but, however some users are reporting that turning it on brake new tabs.