Google Maps Engine API Allow Build Maps Engine-powered Applications

Google Maps Engine API open for developers to build Maps Engine-powered applications. Access Maps Engine data directly, reading from, writing to spatial data hosted on Google's cloud. New 1,000 Street View Locations.

Update 06/14: Google making its Google Maps more comprehensive and useful today adding more than 1,000 Street View locations from around the world.

The new panoramic imagery of historical landmarks to sports stadiums, from Asia, Europe, Latin America, the U.S. and Canada--help you ease into vacation mode with just a few simple clicks.

Google Maps Engine API, allows developers to bring the power of Maps Engine into their own applications.

Google Maps Engine is changing the way enterprises create and use maps - replacing complex GIS technologies with accurate and comprehensive Google Maps-based tools.

With "Maps Engine" organizations "can use Google's fast and reliable cloud infrastructure to layer their data on top of a Google Map and share their custom-made Google Maps with employees, customers or the public-at-large. At the push of a button an organization can share their maps internally or publish them on the web, making it easy to access their data from anywhere," explains Google.

The new API provides "direct access to Maps Engine for reading and editing spatial data hosted in the cloud."

With the API, "organizations can develop on any platform - web, Android, iOS and server-to-server - and build applications like store locators, crowdsourced maps or crisis-response maps," adds Google.

For more information, on Google Maps Engine, check out the newly launched API web page.

Google Map Engine Infographic

Update 06/07: Also this week, Chris Broadfoot released a Google Maps Shortcut on his Android Maps Utility Library.

You can check out his code on Github, and the full video below:

Next week, Google will be doing a Maps Shortcut on Tile Layers in Google Maps SDK for iOS.

Also, Google is begining a new online course on Monday, June 10, to help you learn to tell a visual story of interesting places, and more with Mapping with Google.