New Notifications Inbox in Google Apps Admin Control Panel

Insights on how Google+ is working to amplify auto brands' existing marketing campaigns. New Google Apps Notifications Inbox replaces Alerts & Notifications box. Court rules Google can monetize your name.

Google Apps, Google Apps for Business, Government and Education gets the new "Notifications Inbox" in the admin control panel--that replaces the old Alerts & Notifications box in the admin control panel.

This new Notifications Inbox can be accessed by clicking on the bell icon on the top right. Admins now have the ability to see the number of available notifications. They can also dismiss notifications that aren't important.

In other Google news, today, the company has published an infographic showing off how the automotive brands are making big with adopting Google+.

"Our research has shown that the path to buying a car is becoming more and more social, with consumers relying on information and advice from their social connections and brands to inform their purchase. For example, we found that brands can experience a 91% increase in conversion rate for non-brand terms when running social annotations on search ads," Google wrote.

Brands are using G+ communities in unique ways to launching new car models via Hangouts. Check out the infographic below (click to enlarge):

Infographic: Fueling discoverability and engagement for automotive brands with Google+

Update:Some other Google news:

Google at the SXSW conference in Austin, when asked via Twitter about how Google views Bing's Scroogled campaign, the search head responded "We focus on our users." And, "Others should focus on building good products, too."

Google is also looking to cracking down on bad merchants to drop their Google search ranking, during the "How to Rank Better in Google & Bing" session, Matt Cutts to concerns of one merchant about the bad competitors outranking him responded:

"We have a potential launch later this year, maybe a little bit sooner, looking at the quality of merchants and whether we can do a better job on that, because we don't want low quality experience merchants to be ranking in the search results."

Finally, Google has won a lawsuit filed in 2009 by Wisconsin woman, Beverly Stayart over Google Instant suggestions and various other search engines leading to a search results of her by placing it next to words like "Levitra," "Cialis," and various porn-related ads.

On Wednesday last, the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago tossed her yet another loss in her lawsuit against Google, upholding a decision made by a district court in 2011.

"Stayart has not articulated a set of facts that can plausibly lead to relief under Wisconsin's misappropriation laws," the court wrote (via).

In fact, the court cited her own previous case against Yahoo!, in which that court found that there had to be a "substantial rather than an incidental connection between the use and the defendant's commercial purpose."