Google Announces $23M for Nonprofit Tech Innovators through Global Impact Awards; Knowledge Graph Expands to European Languages

A new Global Impact Awards program to support organizations using technology and innovative approaches to tackle some of the toughest human challenges launched today provides $23M for nonprofit tech innovators."From real-time sensors that monitor clean water to DNA barcoding that stops wildlife trafficking, our first round of awards provides $23 million to seven organizations changing […]

Google Global Imapct Program offer $23 million to nonprofit tech innovators

A new Global Impact Awards program to support organizations using technology and innovative approaches to tackle some of the toughest human challenges launched today provides $23M for nonprofit tech innovators.

"From real-time sensors that monitor clean water to DNA barcoding that stops wildlife trafficking, our first round of awards provides $23 million to seven organizations changing the world.[…]With the type of clout that Google has in the tech space, and the world of innovation, this is an extremely important move for nonprofits to pay attention to. Basically, if Google can "put its money where its mouth is", amazing world-changing things can happen," stated Jacquelline Fuller, Director of Giving at Google.

Benefit from the program include:

  • "Charity: water: Real-time technology to monitor water and ensure it gets to more people
  • Consortium for the Barcode of Life: DNA barcoding to identify and protect endangered wildlife
  • DonorsChoose.org: New program to enroll more underrepresented students in advanced classes
  • Equal Opportunity Schools: Data to identify high-performing yet underrepresented students
  • Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media: Tools to analyze and promote gender equality in media
  • GiveDirectly: Mobile technology to put money directly into the hands of the poor
  • World Wildlife Fund: New technologies to advance anti-poaching efforts," informs Google.

Google at the LeWeb Paris, just announced that Knowledge Graph is now available in a number of new languages, including Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Japanese, Russian, or Italian. So in Japanese, your search for [白鵬] will bring up the top-ranked sumo wrestler, including his heya and ranks, and help you discover other highly-ranked sumo wrestlers.

"This is more than just translation. The Knowledge Graph needs to account for different meanings of the same word -- "football" means something quite different in the U.S. than in Europe. It also needs to recognize what's most important in a particular region," google said.

Google also revealed that "Knowledge Graph now covers 570 million entities, 18 billion facts and connections, and about three times as many queries globally as when first launched in August."

Google Knowledge Graph expands to European launguages