Windows Store Hits 20K Apps; Windows 8 Product Keys Now Embedded in BIOS; Xbox TV Debut Next Year!; Kinect for Windows Help Put Kids at Ease at Alex's Cancer Treatment Center

Windows Store available across devices on all Windows 8 platforms, grow to more than 20,000 apps worldwide, according to latest numbers, "there are now total 20,610 apps available in the Windows Store, with 17,958 of them are offered under a freeware license.""20,610 apps worldwide in the Windows Store (broke 20,000 on Tuesday, I believe). 17,958 […]

Windows Store available across devices on all Windows 8 platforms, grow to more than 20,000 apps worldwide, according to latest numbers, "there are now total 20,610 apps available in the Windows Store, with 17,958 of them are offered under a freeware license."

"20,610 apps worldwide in the Windows Store (broke 20,000 on Tuesday, I believe). 17,958 of those are free (87%)," according to a tweet from WinAppUpdate.

Microsoft's Keith Lorizio, VP, U.S. Sales & Marketing, in an interview in October said that Windows 8's Store would grow so much after the official launch of the new operating system that it would eventually reach the 100,000 unit milestone by February.

Microsoft in an attempt to curb piracy, starting with Windows 8 chnage the way it offer OEM license keys to buyers--now instead of pasting the product key on label on the devices,
"the all new Windows 8 devices comes with license key's embedded in to the BIOS." Thus, making it safer for buyer to losing the key, and at the same time "the key automatically gets inserted in the Windows 8, as and when it is installed."

Also, if for some reasons, you decide to remove recently released Release Preview of Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 7, to get back to IE9, here is how to do it in an easy way:

"Click "Start" button and type "Programs and Features" in the search box. Now, click on the "View installed updates" in the left pane. Go over to the "Uninstall an update" screen and scroll down to the "Microsoft Windows" section. Simply select Internet Explorer 10 and click "Uninstall." A reboot is required to complete the removal and restore IE9.

One of the most common reason of not liking IE10 on Windows 7 is the disabled "Aero" interface that automatically disable after the launch of Internet Explorer 10 and, so far, there's no way to restore it.

According to a new report suggesting that Microsoft will offer a low-cost alternative to the Xbox console and this new device will be a Xbox TV set-top box (STB). Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer recently reimagined Microsoft as the "devices and services company." And, at the heart of this vision is Xbox platform.

Microsoft wants this device to be always on and provide instant access to TV and entertainment. "We're told that the set-top box is part of a two-SKU strategy for Microsoft's next-generation of Xbox hardware that will be unveiled in 2013, with a release date ahead of the holiday shopping season," reads the report.

In essence, this set-top box will run core components of Windows 8 and support casual gaming rather than full Xbox games. Microsoft wants this device to be always on and provide instant access to TV and entertainment.

Finally, a children's hospital in Miami, Florida-- is now using technology to put patients at ease and Kinect for Windows plays a big role in the new clinical approach--"that helps put its patients at ease by engaging them with interactive screens that allow them to be transported into different environments--where they become a friendly teddy bear, frog, or robot and control their character's movements in real time."

The goal is to help reinforce patients' mind-body connection with engaging play and entertainment, as well as to potentially reduce their fear of technology and the treatments they face. As an added benefit, nurses can observe a child's natural range of movement during play and more easily draw out answers to key diagnostic questions.

"As soon as they walk in, technology is embracing them," said Dr. Julio Barredo, chief of pediatric services at alex's place in The Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Health Systems.