Gmail in Cherokee; Google Maps Guided a 5,000-mile Walk Across Asia; New Sandbox for 64-bit Chrome OS and Linux

Gmail in Cherokee, yest! Google just launched the Gmail in 57th language. "Gmail in Cherokee (or ᏣᎳᎩ pronounced "jaw la gee"), and the Cherokee version of Google Web Search both include a virtual keyboard for typing the syllabary writing system invented by Sequoyah in the early 1800s," google posted. So, those who speak Cherokee (ᏣᎳᎩ) […]

Gmail in Cherokee, yest! Google just launched the Gmail in 57th language. "Gmail in Cherokee (or ᏣᎳᎩ pronounced "jaw la gee"), and the Cherokee version of Google Web Search both include a virtual keyboard for typing the syllabary writing system invented by Sequoyah in the early 1800s," google posted.

So, those who speak Cherokee (ᏣᎳᎩ) can now switch to Cherokee in Settings.

Gmail in Cherokee

U.S. Marine Sgt. Winston Fiore, just completed a 5,000-mile walk across Asia, guided by Google Maps.

In Oct 2011, Winston set out on a 5,000-mile trek across Southeast Asia as part of a mission dubbed "Smile Trek" to raise money and awareness for the ICSF. He walked 5,000 miles in 408 days, with more than $65,000 raised for ICSF.

"Armed with sturdy boots, a 20-pound vest carrying essentials and an Android phone with Google Maps -- which helped him to find accurate and easy-to-use walking directions everywhere he went. In addition, Winston also used Latitude to keep his family, friends and supporters informed and Translate to communicate with locals," google posted.

Sandboxing is a layer of security that Chrome places between attackers and their computer, aiming to isolate an attacker who has successfully exploited a vulnerability.

The latest stable version of Chrome introduces a new layer of sandboxing of Chrome renderers for the 64-bit versions of Chrome OS and Linux, based on a new kernel feature called seccomp-bpf.

"With seccomp-bpf we'll install a small filter in the kernel that will quickly reject many of the rocks thrown by an attacker," google posted.

This new sandbox layer is automatically baked into the latest version of Chrome OS. On Linux, "you can check by going to chrome://sandbox and look for "Seccomp-BPF sandbox Yes"," google added.

Stable Chrome adds new Sandbox to 64-bit  Chrome OS and Linux