Merch Store Sunsets, 'Merch Annotations' Open to All Verified YouTube Partners; Explore Galaxy Through New Chrome Experiment '100,000 Stars'

YouTube is now allowing "all verified partners in good standing to link to their merch directly in their videos through new Merch Annotation, including merchandise sold in various online stores.""Merch Annotations," that replaces Merch Store --going forward will "allow you to link to any of your products on the following retail destinations: Google Play, Shopify, […]

YouTube Sunsets Merch Store, Merch Annotations open to all partner in good standing

YouTube is now allowing "all verified partners in good standing to link to their merch directly in their videos through new Merch Annotation, including merchandise sold in various online stores."

"Merch Annotations," that replaces Merch Store --going forward will "allow you to link to any of your products on the following retail destinations: Google Play, Shopify, District Lines, Cafepress, Spreadshirt, Topspin, Jinx, Songkick, and iTunes," informs Google.

Google notes that they require "Merch Annotations only link to your own licensed merchandise."

With Merch Annotation, YouTube sunsetting the Merch Store starting today.

Google says it has added more retailers than were available through the Merch Store and will be adding even more in the next few months.

The process for creating Merch Annotations works the same as for making other Annotations, see this Help Center for instructions.

Visualizing the exact location of every star in the galaxy is a problem of, well, galactic proportions. With over 200 billion stars, capturing every detail of the Milky Way currently defies scientists and laptops alike. However, using imagery and data from a range of sources, including NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA), we were recently able to take one small step in that direction by plotting the location of the stars closest to our sun.

Google created a new Chrome Experiment called 100,000 Stars that visualizes the stellar neighborhood.

The experiment support for WebGL, CSS3D, and Web Audio and let you "using your mouse or trackpad, zoom in and out to explore galaxy."

"Zooming in reveals the names of the most prominent stars close to our sun - click each name to learn more about it and see a digital rendition. Zooming in further shows the relative location of the Oort cloud, the planetary orbits, and finally the Sun. Zooming out gives you some context for where we are in the Milky Way, although please keep in mind this view is an artist's rendition. Click the tour button in the upper left for a quick trip to some of the coolest perspectives in the galaxy," google explains.

Zoom in to the Galaxy, visit 100,000 Stars website.

Google also announced of a $3 million grant to the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), a leading non-profit organization that works to create greener buildings and communities in the U.S. and around the world.

Google Chrome Expriment 100,000 Stars