DCMS: Google Dragging of its Feet to Derank "Piracy" Websites; Panda Update 21 Impacts 1.1% of English Queries in U.S.

Google rolled out worldwide, the Panda update that "will impact about 0.4% of queries that a regular user might notice. For those searching in the United States in English, the percentage is higher. 1.1%," Google said.In other news, the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has accused Google of not deranking the "piracy" websites […]

Google rolls out Panda Algorithm Update 21

Google rolled out worldwide, the Panda update that "will impact about 0.4% of queries that a regular user might notice.

For those searching in the United States in English, the percentage is higher. 1.1%," Google said.

In other news, the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has accused Google of not deranking the "piracy" websites as it promised to do back in August to delist stating, "that it would not return "piracy" websites in its search results as an attempt to see off alleged assaults on the media cartels' most-holy copyrights."

The Guardian reports that DCMS says it will examine the technical changes promised by Google in August, when it pledged to relegate sites that persistently flout copyright laws.

A spokesman for the DCMS said the government would "consider our options" following the review, raising the prospect of fresh legislation that would force Google to downgrade pirated material in search results.

"The Department is aware of the concerns raised by rights holders that this has not had the impact that they hoped, and, together with industry, we now need to review the effect of the technical change made by Google and consider our options," said a spokesperson. "This is part of a wider campaign to tackle online infringement, which includes working together with payment facilitators (such as credit card companies) and online advertising bodies to reduce the revenue flowing to seriously infringing - often criminal - sites."

A spokesperson for the DCMS said it is, and will keep, working with Google and other search engines in this area.

Google maintained that it was taking action against piracy websites and had demoted millions of sites every month. A spokesman for Google said:

"We continue to work closely with the industry to protect rights holders and their material. Sites with high numbers of removal notices are now more likely to appear lower in our results, we've made it easier to report pirated material and now take down more than seven million infringing links per month."