Movie Trailers Right in Google Search Results (SERPs); Launches Remarketing in Search Beta

Looking for a movie just got easier, thanks to an improvement that Google introduced to its search results -- enabling to watch trailers directly from the search results page. Google says that a new "trailer" button will appear on searches for specific movie titles, and or queries.For example, "if you want to check out all […]

Looking for a movie just got easier, thanks to an improvement that Google introduced to its search results -- enabling to watch trailers directly from the search results page. Google says that a new "trailer" button will appear on searches for specific movie titles, and or queries.

For example, "if you want to check out all of the movies available in your area, you can search [showtimes nyc] or [movies nyc] on google.com in English, click the Trailer button next to a listed movie, and the official trailer on YouTube will pop up," Google explains.

If the movie is not of your interest, clicking on the X in the right-hand corner, you can watch the other trailers available.

The Trailer button is also available if you're searching for a specific movie--say, [finding nemo 3d].

On that more generic type of search, Google offers a list of movies with corresponding trailer buttons, like this:

Google now shows movie trailers on search results page

Google has also recently announced a beta program called "Remarketing in Search," which aims to take the benefits of remarketing and leverage them within the SERP environment.

With the Remarketing in Search Beta, Google's idea is to "create remarketing lists as you do with display, but leverage this customer knowledge to impact you're messaging and bidding strategy within your SEM campaigns to improve performance." The benefits include:

  • "Maximizing relevant ad copy. If you know a user has been looking for "red shoes" on your site, use that information to stand out among your competition in the SERP when the user next searches on "women's shoe stores." By applying your knowledge of what the user has been looking for, you can likely increase your CTR and drive visits, while increasing your quality score.
  • Value of the customer and associated click value. A user who is familiar with your brand is more likely to convert to a buyer and as such, being able to reach known users within the SERP should impact your bidding strategy. Just like you can increase your CPCs on keywords that convert better to maximize potential, now you increase your CPCs on known customers to maximize potential.
  • Landing Page Selection. Knowing the content the user has visited can impact the landing page your search ads link to. In the above "red shoes" example, the standard landing page for "women's shoe stores" may be your homepage, or a store listings page. However, knowing the user is interested in red shoes, and with "red shoes" in your ad copy, you can land the user back to your red shoes page. You are in effect, creating "personalized landing page relevancy" based on the user's history," Google informs.

Here are a few standards that need to be managed in order to leverage the opportunity:

  • "Clients must use Google remarketing pixels to create the cookie pools associated with retargeting.
  • Unique campaigns must be built separate from existing search campaigns. While seemingly straightforward, this creates a competitive landscape whereby your remarketing campaign will compete for visibility with your standard campaign. As we understand it, "normal quality score rules" will determine which campaign (and associated bid) is triggered by each unique search query. Knowing that your remarketing campaign won't have any history behind it, expect to manage your bids accordingly in order to ensure visibility.
  • Ad copy cannot expressly call out that you know what the user is looking for. Using the same "red shoes" example, while you can leverage "red shoes" in your copy, you can't specifically call out "looking for red shoes?" There's a fine line that we as marketers must keep in mind. It will be interesting to see how Google polices this aspect moving forward" Google explains.