Insights for Search Merges into Google Trends; Updates Line Chart, Map Using Chart Tools; Query Autocomplete for Google Places Places Autocomplete; Now Sync Google Contacts on iOS Using 'CardDAV'

Since Google Trends and Google Insights for Search launched, Google says millions of people using Trends to keep up with trending interests online. Trends data can be used to better understand global trends -- identifying health trends such as in flu trends, nowcasting in economics, and studies on the predictability of search trends. And it […]

Since Google Trends and Google Insights for Search launched, Google says millions of people using Trends to keep up with trending interests online. Trends data can be used to better understand global trends -- identifying health trends such as in flu trends, nowcasting in economics, and studies on the predictability of search trends. And it has been used in many scientific articles across disciplines.

And, a range of journalists, businesses and researchers around the world using Insights for Search to compare the popularity of search terms over time and across regions.

In a blog post Google notes, that over the time, some steady improvements made to the Google Trends most recently revamping Hot Searches list to provide richer context for breakout searches.

Today, Google merged Insights for Search into Google Trends, "wrapping it all up in a clean new interface to give a clearer view of what's on the world's mind." "The new Google Trends now includes features from both products and makes it easier and more intuitive to dig into the data," Google writes.

In addition, Google also updated the line chart and map using HTML5 based Google Chart Tools, "so users can now load the page on mobile devices, visualize the results without scrolling, and get Hot Searches not just for the U.S., but also India, Japan, and Singapore," Google added.

Google Places Autocompletefeature that make entering addresses into HTML forms quick and easy for users -- today, gets "Query Autocomplete," available as part of both the Google Places API and the Google Maps JS API Places Library.

"The "Query Autocomplete" includes popular queries alongside place and address predictions, and Javascript Autocomplete Data Services, which allows you to style and mix in your own predictions while using the Google Maps JavaScript API. This feature has the same type-ahead-search behavior of the original Place Autocomplete, but just like the Google Maps search field, it returns places, addresses, and popular queries, such as "italian restaurants" or "swimming pool"," Google explains.

Autocomplete Data Services. Both Place Autocomplete and Query Autocomplete now have data services that return predictions in a JSON collection. With this collection, "you have complete control over your text inputting and autocomplete experience while using the Google Maps JS API," Google said.

"This control allows for mixing in your own predictions, such as the user's home location or her favorite restaurant, or styling predictions to better match your application."

"Our Autocomplete services do not need to be used in conjunction with a map, but it does require a "powered by Google" logo to appear under the text field if a map isn't shown," Google added.

Google Places Autocomplete Now Adds Query Autocomplete

Google until now supported "IMAP for email" and "CalDAV for calendar" open protocols for accessing Gmail and Calendar from mobile apps and devices.

"These protocols, combined with the options to access Gmail, Calendar, and Contacts with your desktop or mobile browser and via native apps on iOS and Android, help ensure you have a great experience regardless of the device you use."

Starting today, the company adding a new "CardDAV" open protocol for contacts - to that list.

"CardDAV enables 3rd party clients, like the iOS contacts app, to sync your Google contacts. By supporting IMAP, CalDAV, and CardDAV together, we're making it possible for 3rd parties to build a seamless Google Account sync experience," informs Google.

To sync your Google Contacts on iOS using CardDAV, please follow these instructions in this Gmail Help article.

Update: After almost three years, Rupert Murdoch, who shutter downed the "London Times" with a paywall back in 2009, preventing search engines including Google from indexing the stories -- is now opening up the paper to search engines "although they will only get two lines of each story."

TechDirt notes that the Times will still be a paid subscription and that the content will still live behind a paywall. However, now that consumers can be made aware of stories behind that wall, in whatever truncated form, perhaps that subscriber number will rise.

Approximately 200,000 subscribers later (or 130,751 if you're to believe PaidContent), the experiment was clearly a failure.