YouTube Videos Now in Google Takeout; Google+ Events, RSVP, Invite, Comment Comes to Gmail; In Two Weeks Street View Coming to Google Maps for Mobile Including iOS

Your YouTube original videos now available in Google Takeout. Previously, you've been able to download individual transcoded videos from your YouTube Video Manager. But starting today, you also have a more efficient way to download your videos from YouTube. With Google Takeout, "you can download all of the original videos that you have uploaded in […]

Your YouTube original videos now available in Google Takeout. Previously, you've been able to download individual transcoded videos from your YouTube Video Manager.

But starting today, you also have a more efficient way to download your videos from YouTube.

With Google Takeout, "you can download all of the original videos that you have uploaded in a few simple clicks. No transcoding or transformation -- you'll get exactly the same videos that you first uploaded. Your videos in. Your videos out," posted Google.

Check it out https://www.google.com/takeout/#custom:youtube.

Googel Takeout now let you download YouTube videos

Also, a new Gmail feature launches today bring the Google+ Events notifications to your inbox. Starting today, Gmail users will now be able to invite friends, read and respond to comments, and RSVP with one click ... all without leaving your inbox.

Gmail also recently introduced interactive email notifications for Google+, that allow Google+ users to view, comment and +1 posts from Gmail without having to leave the application.

In addition to above, Google+ users will also be able to share photos that were attached to the event, Google announced in a G+ post.

Google+ Events notification,RSVP,Invite Friends and more comes to Gmail

Now some news, on Apple and Google Maps' rift on iOS 6 -- was apparently caused by "turn-by-turn navigation" feature among other factors.

According to AllThingsD citing multiple sources familiar with Apple's thinking, "Apple wanted turn-by-turn, and that Google was reluctant to give up a key competitive advantage for Android. Google also wanted more control over Maps on iOS and its attendant features, including clear Google branding within the native iOS maps app, and the addition of friend-finding geolocation service Google Latitude. Apple didn't want Google having so much access to users of its platforms," the report claims.

Hence, Apple decided to go it alone, believing its progress via the purchase of Placebase, Poly9 and C3 Technologies would be enough to build its own product on. But according to consumer and media response following iOS 6's introduction, it looks like the company may have jumped the gun too early.

A Google PR responded, "We're staying with our original statement that we believe Google Maps are the most comprehensive, accurate and easy-to-use maps in the world. Our goal is to make Google Maps available to everyone who wants to use it, regardless of device, browser, or operating system."

Meanwhile, Google is bringing its Street View imagery to the mobile web version of Google Maps on Android, iOS and other smartphone platforms in two weeks. The news came after the New York Times' writer David Pogue review of Apple Map app, who writes:

Last week, I used Apple's new Maps app on my iPhone to guide me to a speaking engagement. The GPS navigation screen was clean, bold and distraction-free. The voice instructions spoke the actual street names. The prompts gave me just the right amount of time to prepare for each turn.

There was only one problem: When the app told me that I had arrived, I was sitting in a random suburban cul-de-sac. Children were playing in the front yard, the sky was a crisp blue, and I was late for my talk.

[…]

In short, Maps is an appalling first release. It may be the most embarrassing, least usable piece of software Apple has ever unleashed.

Pogue's later in the post writes, "You can still use Google's maps -- on the Web. Visit maps.google.com and accept the offer to create a Home-screen icon for you. You won't get spoken directions, but you'll get written directions, public transportation details, live traffic reports and, of course, Google's far superior maps and data."

Adding, "(In two weeks, you'll be able to get Street View this way, too, says Google.) And you can install the Google Plus Local app for full access to Google's more complete database of shops and businesses," he said.