Windows Phone 8 SDK Preview Program Application Open Until Monday, September 17, 5pm PDT

Begining today, requests for access to the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 Developer Preview program now started. "Request is open until Monday, September 17 at 5pm PDT," Microsoft stated. To apply, visit the Microsoft Connect site and complete a short application. "Be sure to have your Developer ID and Application's Product ID on hand, as well […]

Windows Phone 8 SDK Preview Program Open

Begining today, requests for access to the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 Developer Preview program now started. "Request is open until Monday, September 17 at 5pm PDT," Microsoft stated.

To apply, visit the Microsoft Connect site and complete a short application.

"Be sure to have your Developer ID and Application's Product ID on hand, as well as the name of your local Phone Champ (if you don't know your local Phone Champ, you can always get in touch via the Find My Champ app)," posted Todd Brix on Windows Phone Developer blog.

If you're accepted to the program, "you'll hear from us in the following week with instructions on how to download the SDK and get support for questions and issues," Brix adds.

"The objective is to let developers of our most-downloaded apps start optimizing them for Windows Phone 8, and we expect the majority of published developers in this situation to qualify for access," Brix writes.

Also, note that Windows Phone SDK 8.0 is built on top of Visual Studio 2012, and provide the ability to build applications and games that target both Windows Phone 8 as well as Windows Phone 7.5.

Windows Phone SDK 7.1 can be installed side-by-side with Visual Studio 2012 and runs on Windows 8.

In another blog post, Andrew Whitechapel, eplains how do you ensure that an app built for an earlier release of Windows Phone continues to work great on Windows Phone 8?

The post offer some tips for future proofing apps and readying them for the next release of Windows Phone. Andrew covers following three aspects:

  • "Compatibility: Even though almost everything is different, our app platform maintains a high degree of backward compatibility. So, from the perspective of the platform APIs, you generally don't have to do anything - your app should just continue to work, without any changes. Where this becomes a little less cut-and-dried is if you're doing anything unusual or unsupported in your app.
  • Version resilience: You can't predict the future, so the whole notion of "future proofing" is a little misleading. However, once the future has arrived, you still need to deal with it: how do you make sure your app runs correctly on multiple versions of the platform which support growing sets of features?
  • Hardware resilience: Third, Windows Phone 8 also introduces support for a wider range of physical devices. This means that there are more optional hardware features, and a wider range of capabilities within the non-optional features. A smart developer will accommodate this by building flexibility into his app, to handle the conditions where some feature is not available, or is less capable."

In summary, "consider light-up scenarios, don't use reflection recklessly, be conservative with obfuscation, test for optional hardware and user-enabled features, and pay close attention to memory guidelines," suggests Andrew.