Now Developers from 120 Markets can Publish Windows Store Apps; Embracing UI on Demand with the App Bar

Windows Store before the general availability of Windows 8 on October 26 -- today received a significant rollout -- the Store is now open to all developers in 120 markets.Windows Store is now open for app submissions from all developers - individuals and companies - in supported markets. In a blog post, Microsoft said that […]

Windows Store before the general availability of Windows 8 on October 26 -- today received a significant rollout -- the Store is now open to all developers in 120 markets.

Windows Store is now open for app submissions from all developers - individuals and companies - in supported markets. In a blog post, Microsoft said that "they've added 82 more app submission markets!" That bring the total number of supported markets to 120.

You can check out the complete list of supported markets on the Dev Center.

In addition, Microsoft also announced a number of additional subscription program offerings, "All eligible MSDN subscribers receive a free, one-year Windows Store developer account as part of their MSDN benefits. (Eligible subscriptions include Visual Studio Professional, Test Professional, Premium, Ultimate, and BizSpark.)," stated Ted Dworkin, Partner Program Manager for the Store.

"We have a program for students--DreamSpark--that similarly waives the subscription fee. And we have an offer for businesses in our BizSpark program, as well," Dworkin adds.

If you've not already, getting started is easy--just go to the Windows Store Dashboard on the Windows Dev Center and sign up. And, Dev Tools are avilable for free here, the SDK is here.

SkyDrive App Bar: Windows 8 Apps

In another post on Windows 8 app developer blog, Microsoft talk about "Embracing UI on demand with the app bar."

"Creating a great app requires honing in on what makes your app best in its category and making that shine. Windows 8 provides tools like charms and app bars to make it easy to really focus on what makes your app best in class and minimize anything that distracts from it. Using the app bar is an easy way to do that, and following the common conventions on command placement and contextualizing the app bar allows your users to dedicate their time to enjoying what truly differentiates your app rather than figuring out the command layout. If you use the tools and conventions that Windows 8 provides to focus your UI on what your app is best at then users will get to appreciate what makes your app great," Microsoft stated.

For information on the patterns around on-demand UI, check out http://design.windows.com and the Guidelines for app bars.

For info on the AppBar control in JS, check HTML AppBar control sample, the XAML AppBar control sample, and look up the WinJS.UI.AppBar object, and the Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.AppBar class.