Google Tests Smartphone Icon in Mobile Search Results; Judge Demands Oracle and Google 'Names of their Paid Bloggers'

Google on its search results pages currently testing a new smartphone icon that link to mobile-friendly content. Spotted by Bryson Meunier over the weekend, when search on his Galaxy Nexus running Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) -- in the URL field on the search result, a smartphone icon appears to indicate the availability of mobile content. […]

Google on its search results pages currently testing a new smartphone icon that link to mobile-friendly content.

Spotted by Bryson Meunier over the weekend, when search on his Galaxy Nexus running Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) -- in the URL field on the search result, a smartphone icon appears to indicate the availability of mobile content.

Meunier in a blog post noted, "This is similar to Old Possum/Skip Redirect update Google announced in December, but instead of showing mobile URLs they show a smartphone icon- in a way that's similar to what they have historically shown in feature phone results. If this becomes a permanent addition to the smartphone SERPs, it could give webmasters more incentive to mobilize their content, as searchers might click through more often to content they know is going to be usable for their device."

A Google spokesperson confirmed the experiment to Meunier, saying,

"We're experimenting with ways to optimize the mobile search experience, including helping users identify smartphone-optimized sites. We don't have any more details to share at the moment, but thank you for checking in."

Google Tests Smartphone optimized icon on Mobile Search Results Pages (SERPs)

While on Google, here is some interesting news,

U.S. District Judge William Alsup in the ongoing lawsuit between the two companies is demanding the names of any writers who have a paid relationship with Oracle or Google.

Oracle vs. Google: U.S. District Judge demans 'Names of Paid Bloggers'

The order was filed in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.

Alsup wrote he is concerned that the parties and/or their lawyers may have hired or paid journalists, commentators or bloggers who then commented on the case. Alsup writes:

"Although proceedings in this matter are almost over, they are not fully over yet and, in any event, the disclosure required by this order would be of use on appeal or on any remand to make clear whether any treatise, article, commentary or analysis on the issues posed by this case are possibly influenced by financial relationships."

Oracle and Google must turn over the names by August 17.

The controversy is enveloping Florian Mueller, who has been covering the trial recently stated that Oracle is paying him as a consultant. His posts, surprise, have been very much in favor of Oracle's arguments. Mueller with a well-known court reporter Ginny LaRoe excahnged this (via):

"The Oracle-Google trial has been a contentious one.Thankfully, though, Oracle lost to Google in its fight to copyright APIs."

Finally, here is a new infographic from the BrandYourself explaining how over 100,000 BrandYourself users rank on Google, showing how social media sites can help: (click to enlarge)

Infographic: How People look goog in Google