Facebook Launches 'Mobile Ads Beta for Apps'; SDK 3.0 for iOS Out of Beta.Ready for Use

New Mobile Ads for Apps, launches today offer new way for Facebook mobile app developers to grow their business with an ad unit that helps them reach and reengage their users."We're beginning to test the ad unit with a limited set of beta partners," facebook announced.Mobile ads are an additional way to drive people to […]

New Mobile Ads for Apps, launches today offer new way for Facebook mobile app developers to grow their business with an ad unit that helps them reach and reengage their users.

"We're beginning to test the ad unit with a limited set of beta partners," facebook announced.

Mobile ads are an additional way to drive people to apps. "When a person clicks on one of these ads, if they do not have the app installed they will be sent to the App Store or Google Play to get it," Facebook said.

Facebook Moible Ads for Apps

In the past 30 days, "we have sent people to the Apple App Store and Google Play 146 million times, via clicks from channels such as news feed, timeline, bookmarks and App Center," says the social networking company.

Designing, launching and monitoring your mobile app ad campaign takes place within the App Dashboard with a simple flow. "From within the App Dashboard, choose your app and audience. Next, set your budget. Choose your payment method and start your ad campaign. You can monitor your ad's performance," facebook explains.

Those interested in participating in the beta program, can sign-up here.

Check out the visula walkthrough embedded below at the end of this post.

Alos, Facebook SDK 3.0 for iOS is now ready for use in the iOS apps and enables several new features including: "ready-to-use native UI controls, better session management, improved support for calling Facebook APIs and support for modern Objective-C language features."

The SDK also includes a variety of pre-built user interface (UI) components for common functions, such as Login, Friend Picker and Place Picker. Simply drop them into your apps for a fast, native and consistent way to build common features.

Facebook SDK 3.0 for iOS Out of Beta, Ready for Use

Here's a rundown of the key updates:

  • Updated native UI components and added internationalization support
  • Refined and simplified core APIs, including session and request objects

Facebook noted, at this point, they'll maintain two versions of the SDK: "a master version that reflects production codebase, and a beta version that also includes the forthcoming iOS 6 integration."

You can download Facebook SDK for iOS 3.0 here.

Facebook Mobile Ads for App visual walkthrough:

Facebook Mobile Ads for App visual walkthrough

In other blog post, Facebook explains the building and testing process at Facebook. In the post, Facebook says, to keep improving, "we must constantly test different versions of Facebook with real people to even have a chance at creating the best possible experience."

"Every day, we run hundreds of tests on Facebook, most of which are rolled out to a random sample of people to test their impact. For example, you may have seen a small test for saving news feed stories last week."

"Other products might require network effects to be properly tested, so in those cases we launch to everyone in a specific market, like a whole country.

That's why we've developed a sophisticated and flexible tool called "gatekeeper" to make sure tests don't collide with each another and that they provide statistically meaningful results. This allows us to roll things out slowly and make improvements as we go. Not every test we do ends up being integrated into the product, but even failed tests help us understand how to make Facebook easier to use, faster and more engaging.

We are sensitive to the fact that testing in this manner has a real cost. It means that people sometimes experience Facebook in a way that is inconsistent or less polished than they expect. In fact, the odds are good that everyone on Facebook has been, at some time, part of a test. We know this can be annoying so we do our best to minimize the impact of these tests, but the fact we are willing to incur it at all should make it clear how deeply we believe that they are one of our best opportunities to make the product better.

It is worth noting that the vast majority of the tests we do are small. For example: when people go to find friends, we used to show as many names and faces as we could fit on the screen to minimize scrolling. We ran a test which instead reduced the number of people we showed per page by 60% but gave each more space and a larger button to engage with, and we saw a 70% increase in friend requests. Given a more consumable interface, people were more able to find people they wanted to connect with. This may sound obvious but, in the words of growth engineering manager Mike Curtis, "It's always obvious why the winning test won... after you've run the test."," facebook explains.