Chrome Stable Release Enable Grant Web Apps Access to Webcam, Microphone

Chrome Stable Release Enable Grant Web Apps Access to Webcam, Microphone; Now Support Mac Retina, Gamepads, Integrates Cloud Print

Google Chrome Stable release, now "when given permission, can "a web apps, could hear" as well through the new "getUserMedia API," which is a new real-time communications standard which aims to allow high-quality video and audio communication on the web," Google explained.

"The API lets you grant web apps access to your camera and microphone without a plug-in. It also allows web apps to create awesome new experiences like Webcam Toy and Magic Xylophone," posted Shijing Xian, Software Engineer and Real-Time Coder.

"Once you've taken your picture, it's transformed into a line drawing a robot can understand using HTML5 canvas. Your portrait is then drawn by one of the eight Sketchbots in London. You can choose to be sent a video of the whole process," explains Xian.

In Chrome Web Lab, if you're on the latest version of Chrome, the Sketchbots experiment uses getUserMedia to let you take a picture of your face, which is then converted to a line drawing and sent to a robot in the Science Museum in London.

"The robot then draws out your portrait in a patch of sand, which you can watch live on YouTube and visitors can watch in person at the museum," Xian adds.

In addition, this release also includes deeper Google Cloud Print integration, expanded support for gamepads, and support for high-resolution Mac Retina screens.

To check it all out, download Google Chrome here.

Here are examples:

A picture is transformed into a line drawing a robot can understand using HTML5 canvas:

Portrait is then drawn by one of the eight Sketchbots in London:

Some of the most important things keeping you safe in Chrome are Safe Browsing, auto-updates, and sandboxing. To help you safe online, this release, also introduced "even deeper level of sandbox protection to Adobe Flash Player on Windows."

"Windows Flash is now inside a sandbox that's as strong as Chrome's native sandbox, and dramatically more robust than anything else available," Google said.

Since 2010, "we've been working with Adobe to sandbox the Flash Player plug-in to protect users against common malware. We started porting Flash from the aging NPAPI architecture to our sandboxed PPAPI platform. Now, thanks this new plug-in architecture, Flash on Windows is inside a sandbox that's as strong as Chrome's native sandbox, and dramatically more robust than anything else available," Google stated.

Also, this release for the first time ever, introduces Windows XP users (specifically, over 100 million Chrome users) "a sandboxed Flash," making them much safer online.

Chrome OS already had this deeper Flash sandboxing from the beginning, Linux too had it since Chrome's last stable release, and Mac support is on the way, Google said.

"By porting Flash to PPAPI we've been able to achieve what was previously impossible with NPAPI for the 99.9% of Chrome users that rely on Flash," Google wrote.

Beyond the security benefits, "PPAPI has allowed us to move plug-ins forward in numerous other ways. By eliminating the complexity and legacy code associated with NPAPI, we've reduced Flash crashes by about 20%. We can also composite Flash content on the GPU, allowing faster rendering and smooth scrolling (with more improvements to come). And because PPAPI doesn't let the OS bleed through, it's the only way to use all Flash features on any site in Windows 8 Metro mode," Justin Schuh, explained.