Windows Store Pricing and Payment Explained; IE10 Release Preview Suuports Blob Constructor

Microsoft today offered some more details on what application developes can expect when the final version of the Windows Store is launched. "With more than 630 million licenses sold to date, across 200+ countries and regions around the world, Windows has an unrivaled global reach. Combined with the flexibility of monetization options that the Store […]

Microsoft today offered some more details on what application developes can expect when the final version of the Windows Store is launched.

"With more than 630 million licenses sold to date, across 200+ countries and regions around the world, Windows has an unrivaled global reach. Combined with the flexibility of monetization options that the Store provides, Windows 8 represents the single biggest developer opportunity for any platform," wrote Arik Cohen.

Currently, all the "apps that are available in the Windows Store are free for customers to acquire--keeping with the preview nature of the Windows 8 releases to date. At Windows 8 RTM (Release To Manufacturing), all developers signing up for a company account and living in one of the supported countries will be able to publish and offer paid apps," Cohen wrote.

You, as the developer of the app, are always in control of the pricing of your app. When you onboard your app, "you set its price (and the price of any in-app offers that your app provides) by selecting a price tier. Price tiers range from $1.49 to $999.99; you can see the entire list of price tiers on the Dev Center. The currency you pick for the price tier is based on the currency the Windows Store supports in the country you signed up from," stated cohen.

"Price tiers ensure that an equivalent price is selected for selling your app in any currency supported by the Store. The local pricing is derived by foreign exchange rates and rounded to provide the appropriate precision for the standards of a given currency," he explains.

Explaining how the payment works? Cohen notes, devs planning paid apps, will need to provide both tax information, as well as a bank account to deposit proceeds.

"Payments are processed on a monthly basis, and the transactions become eligible for payment 30 days after the purchase occurred. To receive a payment, all you need to do is accumulate $200 or equivalent in app sales that you haven't been paid for yet. Microsoft charges 30% of the app price, until your app reaches $25,000 or equivalent of lifetime sales when they change to 20% of the app price," Cohen notes.

The above terms and processes apply to all transactions made through Microsoft's platform. But developer also have a variety of options to choose to monetize app, content and services including: "trial with easy conversion to the full paid version of your app; In-app purchases to allow monetization over time; Advertising within your app; Billing through your own existing mechanisms," he said.

Moreover, developers "will be able to test the various commerce states so as to ensure that the "Purchase Full Version" button in app is displayed properly when a trial version of the app is running," adds Cohen.

Windows Store list of price tiers of metro style apps

In other Windows 8 news, the IE team today explains that the IE10 in Windows 8 Release Preview support "Blob constructor." Earlier, Microsoft demonstrated IE10's support for a BlobBuilder interface, an in-progress interface in the File API: Writer W3C Working Draft. This interface enables developers to work with files on the client PC. Recently, the W3C working group deprecated the BlobBuilder interface in favor of a new Blob constructor.

"Both the Blob constructor and the BlobBuilder interface enable Web developers to create files on the client. The difference is in the syntax. Whereas BlobBuilder requires each portion of the blob to be appended during a separate call to the append method, the Blob constructor can take an array of arguments," Sharon Newman, Program Manager, Internet Explorer, explained.