Google Releases 'YouTube Upload Widget' and 'YouTube Direct Lite' to Public - Weather OneBox for Tablets Gets New UI; Think Quarterly 'The Play Issue '

Google today announced the "YouTube Upload Widget" that supports webcam uploads, and "YouTube Direct Lite," both of which are now available for public use.YouTube Upload Widget lets website's visitors perform both webcam and file uploads to YouTube. "The support for webcam uploads sets the upload widget apart from the other uploading options that the YouTube […]

Google today announced the "YouTube Upload Widget" that supports webcam uploads, and "YouTube Direct Lite," both of which are now available for public use.

YouTube Upload Widget lets website's visitors perform both webcam and file uploads to YouTube. "The support for webcam uploads sets the upload widget apart from the other uploading options that the YouTube API supports," Google said.

"The widget uses HTML5's postMessage support to send messages back to your website regarding videos uploaded via the widget. When the widget loads, it displays buttons that you can click to either record a webcam video or to select a video file to upload. If the user elects to record or upload a video, the widget will display a popup prompting the user to sign in to her Google Account," explains Google.

Developers who want more control over the uploads experience can use a full JavaScript API to initiate the widget, and listen for events related to the upload.

Using the YouTube Upload Widget site is as simple as adding an <iframe>; to an HTML, like for example:

<iframe id="widget" type="text/html" width="640" height="390" src="https://www.youtube.com/upload_embed?enablejsapi=1&origin=http://example.com" frameborder="0">

YouTube Direct Lite, is a complete rewrite of the existing YouTube Direct platform, and makes it possible to solicit videos from your users and then moderate those submissions into standard YouTube playlists for display.

The "YouTube Direct Lite is implemented purely in client-side HTML, JavaScript, and CSS, and unlike with YouTube Direct, no Java App Engine deployment is needed," Google said.

You can download the YouTube Direct Lite code, customize it, and deploy it on your own web server along with the rest of your site's content.

To make things even easier, "we're hosting a canonical deployment of YouTube Direct Lite that you could include on your pages without having to deploy anything at all--just add the appropriate <iframe> tag to your page," Google said.

You can find a live example of YouTube Direct Lite integration, including the use of the YouTube Upload Widget, on this sample page.

For more detailed information and implementation guide, read here: You can find YouTube Upload Widget, and YouTube Direct Lite.

Here is the YouTube Upload Widget and YouTube Direct Lite in action:

Google also made available a new tablet interface for the "Weather OneBox," now includes information such as: precipitation, humidity, wind speed, hourly weather forecast, 10-day forecast.

The OneBox is interactive and you can select an hour or a day to see the forecast.

Google Weather OneBox for Tablets

"When you type [weather] into Google on your tablet, you'll see the current weather and you can scroll through the hourly and ten-day forecast. You can also toggle the Precipitation and Wind buttons to check out the percent chance of precipitation and wind direction/speed, respectively," informs Google. It should work for iPad and Android tablets.

Think Quarterly The Play Issue

In just a few days the greatest Games of all are coming to London Olympics, with 11,500 athletes taking part in a global celebration of sport. To this end, Google Think Quarterly's lates issue is dedicated to play in all its forms and named "The Play Issue."

"We speak with the world's most playful brands, including the reconstruction of LEGO, the colorful evolution of Crayola and the free-roaming future of Disney. Our Country Director of Brazil, Fabio Coehlo gives readers a tour of marketing's newest and most fun-filled frontier. We were granted exclusive access to the digital teams delivering the Olympics on both sides of the Atlantic; surfaced the latest research from our UX team on social gaming; and learned the secret to making YouTube videos that go viral," posted Rich Pleeth, Think Quarterly Editor.