Google Experiments New Tabular Sitelinks on SERPs - Cutts "It's Much too Soon to Say that Links are Dead"

Google is experimenting a new tabular Mega Sitelinks in the search results on its Google.com for some big brand terms."This new format shows the same number of sitelinks to the search listings with added tabs above the results enabling users to navigate to see more relevant sitelinks for the site by category," reportsKev Strong on […]

Google Tests Tabular Sitelinks on SERPs

Google is experimenting a new tabular Mega Sitelinks in the search results on its Google.com for some big brand terms.

"This new format shows the same number of sitelinks to the search listings with added tabs above the results enabling users to navigate to see more relevant sitelinks for the site by category," reportsKev Strong on Mediaworks.

For example, here are the sitelinks for SEOBook -- Google added tabs for "top links," "free SEO tools," "blog," "training," "support," and "videos", as shown in the picture above.

If you want to see the experiment, "you have to edit the NID cookie via an extension -- just user Edit This Cookie from the Chrome Web store. Go to Google (both U.K. and U.S., reported to be working) and replace the cookie's content with following line then reload Google to get the tabular Mega Sitelink SERPs!," explains SEO consult blog.

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For a few years now, some SEO insiders have suggested that social signals are replacing links as a quality signal for Google's ranking algorithm -- and that refrain has become a bit more common, in the wake of the Panda and Penguin updates. In the video below, Matt Cutts explains that "it's much too soon to say that links are dead."

Update: Google's head of search spam, Matt Cutts said that in future Google may discount the value of links generated by infographics.

Why? Aren't infographics great linkable content? When asked, Cutts said, he finds that often infographics are misleading and outright wrong. "They get far off topic, or the fact checking is really poor." Adding, "The infographic may be neat, but if the information it's based on is simply wrong, then it's misleading people," he said in an interview with Eric Enge.

"This is similar to what people do with widgets as you and I have talked about in the past. I would not be surprised if at some point in the future we did not start to discount these infographic-type links to a degree. The link is often embedded in the infographic in a way that people don't realize, vs. a true endorsement of your site," Matt Cutts told Eric.