YouTube Improvements to Standard & Scheduled Publishing; Using Ruby on Rails, RESTful Web APIs and YouTube

Scheduled publishing in YouTube just recived several updates over the last few months making video reliably go live at the scheduled time and to show up in subscribers' feeds according to the publish time (not upload time).New with standard publishingNotify subscribers at time published (i.e. first set public), not time uploaded - Now, videos will […]

Updates to YouTube Schedule publishing Goes Live

Scheduled publishing in YouTube just recived several updates over the last few months making video reliably go live at the scheduled time and to show up in subscribers' feeds according to the publish time (not upload time).

New with standard publishing
Notify subscribers at time published (i.e. first set public), not time uploaded - Now, videos will :show up in channel and homepage feeds based on the time you mark them public, rather than the original upload time," YouTube informs. YouTube also now use time published in all other search and discovery features throughout the site, so you don't have to worry about keeping videos private for a bit before publishing.

"No more "0% published": Now, no more than a few minutes will pass between when your video is ready to watch, and when it goes out to your subscribers. As opposed to the old system which wouldn't send videos until they processed on all formats (720p, 1080p, etc.), which could sometimes take a while.

New with scheduled publishing
Now, the video will be private until the scheduled publishing time. Google also added information to Video Manager that lets uploaders see when a video will publish in their local time zone. Once complete, a check mark with the confirmed published time will appear.

In other YouTube news, the team YouTube API team today published a couple of videos tutorials -- This video presentation introduces YouTube and its APIs with an emphasis on how you can use them for your business. It includes examples for technical and nontechnical audiences:

This second video right below show that YouTube and Ruby on Rails are a great fit for building interesting educational apps.

Along the way, the tutorial also cover OAuth2, the various client libraries for Ruby, and using test-driven development with RESTful web APIs.