Free Wi-Fi in NYC, Courtesy of Google Offers; Build Experiment Brings LEGO Bricks to Chrome; Google Music Trash Page

Google Offers to the New York City now offering free Boingo Wi-Fi in subway stations and Boingo hotzones across Manhattan. "People can surf the Internet, or discover great local deals from Google Offers, while they're waiting at the subway platform or enjoying summertime in the Big Apple," Google informed.To stay connected above ground, Google Offers […]

Google Offers to the New York City now offering free Boingo Wi-Fi in subway stations and Boingo hotzones across Manhattan. "People can surf the Internet, or discover great local deals from Google Offers, while they're waiting at the subway platform or enjoying summertime in the Big Apple," Google informed.

To stay connected above ground, Google Offers is also sponsoring free Wi-Fi at more than 200 Boingo hotzones across Manhattan.

Starting today through September 7th, anyone can access Boingo Wi-Fi for free at the six NYC subway stations that include:

  • A, C, E station at Eighth Avenue and West 14th Street
  • L station at Eighth Avenue and West 14th Street
  • C, E station at Eighth Avenue and West 23rd Street
  • 1, 2, 3 station at Seventh Avenue and West 14th Street
  • F, M station at Sixth Avenue and West 14th Street
  • L station at Sixth Avenue and West 14th Street

In other Google news,

If you building with LEGOR bricks, Google Australia announced "Build," a new Chrome experiment which lets you explore and build a new world of LEGO creations together online.

Build is first launched in Australia and New Zealand, and will open up in other countries soon.

BUILD experiment brings LEGO Bricks to Chrome

"With 8 trillion bricks, think of Build as the largest LEGO set you've ever seen."

"Build may look simple, but this collaborative 3D building experience would not have been possible a couple of years ago. It shows how far browser technology has come and how the web is an amazing platform for creativity. We made the bricks with WebGL, which enables powerful 3D graphics right in the browser and demonstrates the upper limit of current WebGL graphics performance. We then mixed in Google Maps (another Aussie invention) so you can put your creation in a LEGO world alongside everyone else's," posted Lockey McGrath, Product Marketing Manager, Google Australia and New Zealand.

You can start building at buildwithchrome.com.

Google Music now has a "trash page" that includes all the songs you've deleted. "The songs are permanently deleted after 28 days, but you can also manually do that. There's also an "undelete" button for restoring music files."

You can find the trash page by clicking the "options" icon and selecting "Music trash" from the menu, or visit through this link directly.

Google Music Trash Page

Also, note that the deleted music files doesn't get synced with Google Music Manager. "Once you permanently delete [a song], the content and related data (e.g., stored play counts) will be disassociated from your account. There may be some delay before our systems fully process your removal request. In addition, if this content was purchased from Google Play, the only way to retrieve it is to repurchase the content," Google explains. [Thanks, Alex]