Google Marks Alan Turing's 100th Birthday with Interactive Puzzles Doodle

Google in honor of the World-War II code-breaker Alan Mathison Turing's 100th birthday today posted a animated puzzle(s) doodle.The Google's puzzles doodle, is actually a mock-up of Turing's machine and users have to spell the word 'Google' in the binary code to solve it.After solving the first 6 puzzles, go back to the home page […]

Google in honor of the World-War II code-breaker Alan Mathison Turing's 100th birthday today posted a animated puzzle(s) doodle.

The Google's puzzles doodle, is actually a mock-up of Turing's machine and users have to spell the word 'Google' in the binary code to solve it.

After solving the first 6 puzzles, go back to the home page and reload the doodle; there are an additional 6 puzzles which have increased difficulty. I may also make a video for those solutions later on.

Google's Interactive Puzzle Doodle celebrates Alan Turings 100th Birthday

"We couldn't let such a momentous occasion pass without a doodle. We thought the most fitting way of paying tribute to Turing's incredible life and work would be to simulate the theoretical "Turing machine" he proposed in a mathematical paper," posted Andrew Eland, Engineering Director, Google U.K.

Alan Mathison Turing, (23 June 1912 - 7 June 1954), was a British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst and computer scientist. He was highly influential in the development of computer science, providing a formalisation of the concepts of "algorithm" and "computation" with the Turing machine, which played a significant role in the creation of the modern computer. Turing is widely considered to be the father of computer science and artificial intelligence.

He worked for the Britain's Government Code and Cypher School during World War II at Bletchley Park, Britain's codebreaking centre. He devised a number of techniques for breaking German ciphers, including the method of the bombe, an electromechanical machine that could find settings for the Enigma machine.

Turing later created one of the first designs for a stored-program computer, the ACE.

Here is the puzzle: