Searches on Google.com Surge After Knowledge Graph Launch, Says Google - Peter Carl Fabergé 166th Birthday Doodle

First, Google is celebrating the 166th birthday of Peter Carl Fabergé. "Peter Carl Fabergé also known as "Karl Gustavovich Fabergé" (Russian: Карл Густавович Фаберже, May 30 [O.S. May 18] 1846 - September 24, 1920) was a Russian jeweller, best known for the famous Fabergé eggs, made in the style of genuine Easter eggs, but using […]

Peter Carl Fabergé 166th Birthday Google Doodle

First, Google is celebrating the 166th birthday of Peter Carl Fabergé.

"Peter Carl Fabergé also known as "Karl Gustavovich Fabergé" (Russian: Карл Густавович Фаберже, May 30 [O.S. May 18] 1846 - September 24, 1920) was a Russian jeweller, best known for the famous Fabergé eggs, made in the style of genuine Easter eggs, but using precious metals and gemstones rather than more mundane materials." Wikipedia.

Just in two weeks, since Google launched Knowledge Graph, the searches conducted on Google.com increased. The Knowledge Graph, which was launched on May 16, shows a large box (or "panel", as CEO Larry Page described it) to the right of Google's organic search results on certain queries for noteworthy people, TV shows, sports teams, places, books, and other entities.

Although the company didn't share specific numbers, "Early indications are that people are interacting with it more, learning about more things…and doing more [search] queries," said Amit Singhal, a Google search executive, told the Wall Street Journal in an interview on Friday. "It's stoking people's curiosity."

He said, "people are interacting with it [the Knowledge Graph] more" and "doing more [search] queries." Adding, "For the first time, the search engine understands real-world things," Singhal said.

A Google spokesman Jason Freidenfelds comfirming Singhal's claim said the company's internal data continues to show people are "doing more searches as a result" of the revamp, though he and Singhal declined to share specific figures.

Google Search Serges with Knowledge Graph

Singhal declined to say what percentage of searches were affected by the change, though one person briefed on Google's plans previously said the shift could directly impact the search results for 10% to 20% of all search queries, or tens of billions per month.

Jay Walsh, a spokesman for the Wikimedia Foundation, which runs online encyclopedia Wikipedia, said Google's use of Wikipedia information for the new feature was "suitable" and "ultimately we believe that this increases the visibility of free knowledge to more users." He didn't have data on whether the site had seen an increase of usage since the Google change went into effect.

Down further, As Google continues building its "next generation of search," Singhal noted the Knowledge Graph has had some miscues, such as not being completely up-to-date. For example, initially a Google search for "New York Knicks" gave an incorrect information about the team's coach, who had been replaced in recent months. And he said Google's knowledge graph is still "weak in many areas"--namely products.

He said the revamp was a "baby step" toward building the "search system of tomorrow."

Singhal also discussed the affect on PPC ads, noting that Google is "experimenting" as to what would be the right page design for cases in which there are numerous ads that were sold for a particular query.

For example, a search for "Lake Tahoe" brings up many ads on the right side of search results. But users can push down those ads and see an information box about the lake by clicking an arrow button located below a partial map of the lake.