Google Places API Adds Events Support; Rebooting Computer Science Education in the UK; Partners with Missing Children Europe

Google Places API now offers explicit support for adding events, which are associated with a specific place, such as a concert venue, and have a fixed lifetime. "During the lifetime of an event it is returned in search results, attached to the place concerned. Once the event has ended it is no longer included in […]

Google Places API now offers explicit support for adding events, which are associated with a specific place, such as a concert venue, and have a fixed lifetime. "During the lifetime of an event it is returned in search results, attached to the place concerned. Once the event has ended it is no longer included in search results, but remains accessible by its unique id so that the user's location history is preserved," posted Thor Mitchell, Product Manager, Google Places API.

For more information on how to add support for adding and surfacing events to your Places API applications, check out documentation for Events in the Places API, and Places API Search.

In the video below, Andrés Ferraté of Maps Developer Relations team discusses the Events features of the Places API in more detail:

In other Google news, Eric Schmidt, this week, speaking at London's Science Museum, announced a partnership between Google and TeachFirst, which will help - in at least a small way - address the teacher shortfall.

"Teach First is a UK charity which recruits exceptional graduates and puts them to work in the most challenging schools. Google has provided funds for them to train and support more than 100 first rate science teachers over the next three years, with the majority focused on computer science. Overall we anticipate this should help more than 20,000 pupils from the most disadvantaged UK communities," posted Peter Barron, Director, External Relations, EMEA.

Google Missing Children Europe Collaborates

Missing Children Europe and its member organisations do vital work finding missing or sexually exploited children - and supporting their families in time of crisis with emotional, social and legal help via the European 116000 telephone hotline. Google has been working with the group for a while and today the comapny anoounced that the first part of their collaboration with them is now live, in time for International Missing Children's Day.

Thanks to Google technology embedded in their website, it's now possible to search for publicly available information across all MCE member websites at the same time.

"The European Commission is hosting a conference next week in Brussels to raise awareness about the vital work of the European 116000 Missing Children hotline. If children go missing, relatives can call the hotline and speak with specialists," posted Marco Pancini, Senior Policy Counsel.

Today, Missing Children Europe launched a promotional film short called "Futures", which will run on TV, in cinemas and on YouTube: