Kinect Hack: Head Tracking with a Holographic 3D Display; Kinect Shopping Cart; LightGuide Projected Visualizations for Hand Movement Guidance

Microsoft has just demoed a Kinect-enabled prototype shopping cart designed to take the guesswork out of your trip to the grocery store. "The cart utilizes the Kinect and other sensors to read what you are placing in the cart and check whether the item matches your pre-planned menu and any dietary constrains. If you've blindly […]

Kinect enabled Shopping Cart

Microsoft has just demoed a Kinect-enabled prototype shopping cart designed to take the guesswork out of your trip to the grocery store.

"The cart utilizes the Kinect and other sensors to read what you are placing in the cart and check whether the item matches your pre-planned menu and any dietary constrains. If you've blindly placed an item in the cart that doesn't match with your downloaded list, forget about it. The Kinect Cart will tell gently -- and slightly disapprovingly -- verbally remind you of your mistake, explains," Microsoft.

In fact, all you are required to do is upload a shopping list and place items in the cart.

"Not only is the cart smart enough to check your list, scan your items, ring you out and converse with you -- it is motorized. That means the cart will follow you as you walk down the aisle."

Projet URL.

In another Kinect hack, here is an inspirational project of how the Kinect can be used in an unusual and unique way to teach and training "movement." The "LightGuide: Kinect Teaches Movement is perhaps the most innovative in terms of what you can use a Kinect for.

lightguide: kinect teaches movements

"In most cases the body tracking that the Kinect provides is simply used to find out where the body parts are and react to this in an appropriate way, e.g. by moving a ball. In this case the body tracking is used to locate the body part and project a helpful symbol onto it that indicates how the body part should move to complete the task correctly. For example, if you are learning how to bow a cello then LightGuide will project a symbol showing how you should move your hand to best complete the task. The same applies if you are trying to learn a martial art or dance," Microsoft explains.

Watch the video to find out more, visit Project URL here:

Finally, Back in 2007, an innovative head-tracking demo by Johnny Chung Lee showed off using a modified version of the infrared sensors for the Wii. Over 9.6 million views later, the same technology has been ported for the Microsoft Kinect.

Even though there's a number of good implementations of Kinect head-tracking, Second Story Labs took the idea to the next level with a Planar transparent electroluminescent (EL) display. The end result is a simple but effective simulation of a holographic 3D display.

Here is the video showing off Kinect head-tracking with a transparent screen (simulated holographic 3D display):