German Court Rules Microsoft Infringed Motorola Mobility's Patents

In a blow to Microsoft, a court in Mannheim Germany has ruled that Microsoft infringed on Motorola Mobility's patents and ruled that Microsoft was no longer allowed to sell and ordered to remove its Xbox 360 and Windows 7 operating system software from German stores.Microsoft said that the ruling did not mean that its products […]

In a blow to Microsoft, a court in Mannheim Germany has ruled that Microsoft infringed on Motorola Mobility's patents and ruled that Microsoft was no longer allowed to sell and ordered to remove its Xbox 360 and Windows 7 operating system software from German stores.

Microsoft said that the ruling did not mean that its products would be taken off retailers' shelves because a U.S. district court in Seattle has granted Microsoft a preliminary injunction against Motorola to prevent the phone maker from enforcing any German court order.

"This is one step in a long process, and we are confident that Motorola will eventually be held to its promise to make its standard essential patents available on fair and reasonable terms for the benefit of consumers who enjoy video on the web."

microsoft vs. motorola

"Motorola is prohibited from acting on today's decision, and our business in Germany will continue as usual while we appeal this decision and pursue the fundamental issue of Motorola's broken promise," Microsoft said in a response to the ruling.

However, 'Wednesday's ruling is also expected to have little immediate impact for Microsoft's wider European distribution operations as it has already moved its regional software distribution centre to the Netherlands from Germany in anticipation of adverse judgments in the patent trial," Reuters report.

Germany has in recent months become a major battleground in the global patent war between makers of mobile phones, tablet computer devices and their operating software. Earlier this year German courts forced Korea's Samsung Electronics to stop selling its Galaxy 10.1 tablet in the country and told Apple Inc to de-activate "push" notification features for some customers in Germany.