Google's Animated Horse in Motion Doodle Honors 182nd Birthday of the Eadweard J. Muybridge' Motion Picture Pioneer

Google witha a special animated doodle paying tribute on the 182nd birthday to motion picture innovator Eadweard J. Muybridge, a man whose 1878 series of photos known as "The Horse in Motion" was a precursor to motion pictures, television, and video-sharing sites such as YouTube.Google's "Horse in Motion" doodle above appears as a strip of […]

Google witha a special animated doodle paying tribute on the 182nd birthday to motion picture innovator Eadweard J. Muybridge, a man whose 1878 series of photos known as "The Horse in Motion" was a precursor to motion pictures, television, and video-sharing sites such as YouTube.

182nd Google Birthday Doodle of Eadweard J. Muybridge Animated Horse in Motion Google Doodle Honors Motion Picture Pioneer

Google's "Horse in Motion" doodle above appears as a strip of photos until you click a yellow play button. That puts the horse in motion on what seems to be an endless loop until you click on Google's logo and you're brought to a search results page for [Eadweard J. Muybridge] -- (see the video embedded below).

Eadweard J. Muybridge (9 April 1830 - 8 May 1904) was an English photographer of Dutch ancestry who spent much of his life in the United States. He is known for his pioneering work on animal locomotion which used multiple cameras to capture motion, and his zoopraxiscope, a device for projecting motion pictures that pre-dated the flexible perforated film strip.

Born in Kingston upon Thames, England, he moved to San Francisco, California, in 1855. He took up photography in the 1860s, initially focusing on landscapes and architecture.

In the mid-1880s, Muybridge continued to study the movement of animals as well as nude or mostly nude people using stop-frame photography, eventually publishing a collection of 20,000 pictures in a study called "Animal Locomotion". Muybridge returned home to England in 1894, where he wrote and published a pair of books on his work prior to his death May 8, 1904.