USPTO Grants Microsoft "Interactive Keyboard with Multiple Different Keys' Patent; Nokia Patents New Windows Phone Design

The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) granted a new smartphone design patent to Nokia on March 13, 2012 (D655,698). "The phone design matches exactly to a Nokia Windows Phone render that was leaked back in August 2011, which also happens to the date the patent was filed," Nokiaport.Check out the design below:Look at the […]

The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) granted a new smartphone design patent to Nokia on March 13, 2012 (D655,698). "The phone design matches exactly to a Nokia Windows Phone render that was leaked back in August 2011, which also happens to the date the patent was filed," Nokiaport.

Check out the design below:

Nokia Patents New Windows Phone Design

Look at the positions of the metal strip of Back, Start and Search buttons on the front, the location of the camera at back, as well as the hardware buttons on the side, these renders match exactly that to the Nokia design patent.

Also, a few new Nokia Windows Phones is already in the pipeline, including the Windows Phone 8-based handsets Nokia "Prodigy" and Nokia "AC/DC". And, recently over at OccasionalGamer.com Game Stats page, a new device named Nokia "Fluid" also popped up.

Also, the USPTO on March 22, 2012 grated Microsoft a patent "Interactive Keyboard with Multiple Different Key Aarrangements." Basically, the company is working on producing a keyboard that sports integrated screens inside each key, so that they could be set up for use with different roles when needed.

Microsoft Patents Interactive Keyboard with Multiple Different Key Aarrangements

Per the patent application 20120068933 abstract - A keyboard kit that is "selectively configurable by an end user to provide differing key arrangements is provided."

Microsoft also notes, "The keyboard kit includes a plurality of differently-configured keyboard modules and an underlying display device."

"Each of the plurality of differently-configured keyboard modules may be at least partially see-through and include mechanically-depressible keys, the underlying display device and plurality of differently-configured keyboard modules being configured such that, upon securing of a selected one of the plurality of differently-configured keyboard modules to the underlying display device, the selected one of the plurality of differently-configured keyboard modules covers at least a portion of an operative surface of the underlying display device and enables through-key user viewing of dynamic keyboard imagery from the underlying display device," the abstract reads.