Labels Added in the Google Translator Toolkit

Google added labels in its Translator Toolkit. For those not aware, "Google Translator Toolkit, is an online translation tool built on Google Translate, greatly simplifies the translation workflow through its WYSIWYG editor, real-time collaboration and translation management system in the cloud."Labels are just one way to make it easier to access and organize your Translator […]

Google added labels in its Translator Toolkit. For those not aware, "Google Translator Toolkit, is an online translation tool built on Google Translate, greatly simplifies the translation workflow through its WYSIWYG editor, real-time collaboration and translation management system in the cloud."

Labels are just one way to make it easier to access and organize your Translator Toolkit documents.

"With labels, you can organize your Translator Toolkit documents into any categories you define yourself -- 'high priority,' 'wikipedia,' 'work,' 'later,' etc. -- and in any combination (the beauty of labels is that they can overlap, so one document might be both 'work' and 'high priority')," explains Google.

To put a label on a Translator Toolkit document, just select the file and then click 'Label' to apply an existing label (or labels). You can also create a new label.

And, to access all the documents with a given label (or labels), navigate to 'My labels' on the left side and choose the labels you're interested in.

Adding Labels in Google Translator Toolkit

Access documents with labels in Google Translator Toolkit

In other Google Product,

Google just added a new option to Google News, "the ability to access some news content by responding to microsurveys, without having to pull out your wallet or sign in."

Publishers get paid for hosting surveys. A number of publishers.

"When a site has implemented this option, you'll see a prompt that offers you a choice between answering a market research question or completing another action specified by the publisher (such as signing up for an account or purchasing access). All responses are completely anonymous -- they aren't tied to your identity or later used to target ads," Google explains. The prompts look like this:

Google Consumer Surveys