How Law Enforcement Cracks iPhone & Android's Security Code

Micro Systemation, a Stockholm, Sweden-based firm that sells law enforcement and military customers the tools to access the devices of criminal suspects or military detainees and siphon off their personal information -- last week posted a video showing, a Micro Systemation application the firm calls XRY can quickly crack an iOS or Android phone's passcode, […]

Micro Systemation, a Stockholm, Sweden-based firm that sells law enforcement and military customers the tools to access the devices of criminal suspects or military detainees and siphon off their personal information -- last week posted a video showing, a Micro Systemation application the firm calls XRY can quickly crack an iOS or Android phone's passcode, dump its data to a PC, decrypt it, and display information like the user's GPS location, files, call logs, contacts, messages, even a log of its keystrokes.

The report said the firm uses the same kind of exploits that jailbreakers use to gain access to the phone. Once inside, they have access to just about everything.

"XRY works much like the jailbreak hacks that allow users to remove the installation restrictions on their devices, Mike Dickinson, the firm's marketing director says, though he wouldn't say much about the exact security vulnerability that XRY exploits to gain access to the iPhone." He claims that the "company doesn't use backdoor vulnerabilities in the devices created by the manufacturer, but rather seeks out security flaws in the phone's software just as jailbreakers do, one reason why half the company's 75 employees are devoted to research and development. "Every week a new phone comes out with a different operating sytems and we have to reverse engineer them," he says. "We're constantly chasing the market."