Windows 8 Logo Now 'Officially' Unveiled

Just few days back, we reported, Microsoft has redesigned logo for its upcoming Windows 8 operating system -- it is now official, Microsoft officials shared the new Metro-inspired "reimagined" Windows 8 logo in a February 17 blog post. The final image looks almost identical to the leaked ones.Microsoft claims that Windows 8 is a complete […]

Just few days back, we reported, Microsoft has redesigned logo for its upcoming Windows 8 operating system -- it is now official, Microsoft officials shared the new Metro-inspired "reimagined" Windows 8 logo in a February 17 blog post. The final image looks almost identical to the leaked ones.

new Windows 8 Logo unveiled

Microsoft claims that Windows 8 is a complete reimagination of the Windows operating system. And, that "nothing has been left unexplored, including the Windows logo, to evaluate how it held up to modern PC sensibilities," mentions Sam Moreau, principal director of User Experience for Windows.

"The Windows logo is a strong and widely recognized mark but when we stepped back and analyzed it, we realized an evolution of our logo would better reflect our Metro style design principles and we also felt there was an opportunity to reconnect with some of the powerful characteristics of previous incarnations."

For the new logo, Microsoft worked with Pentagram, to maintain consistency with the Metro design language/style that Microsoft introduced with Windows Phone and even Media Center before that.

Moreau notes, that "with Windows 8 logo;

We wanted the new logo to be both modern and classic by echoing the International Typographic Style (or Swiss design) that has been a great influence on our Metro style design philosophy. Using bold flat colors and clean lines and shapes, the new logo has the characteristics of way-finding design systems seen in airports and subways.

It was important that the new logo carries our Metro principle of being "Authentically Digital". By that, we mean it does not try to emulate faux-industrial design characteristics such as materiality (glass, wood, plastic, etc.). It has motion - aligning with the fast and fluid style you'll find throughout Windows 8.

Our final goal was for the new logo to be humble, yet confident. Welcoming you in with a slight tilt in perspective and when you change your color, the logo changes to reflect you. It is a "Personal" Computer after all."

Microsoft officials are not commenting on whether or not today's logo means Windows 8 will be the final product name for x86/x64 and ARM/SoC versions of what is still being called officially the product codenamed "Windows 8."

The Pentagram design studio posted a video showing the logo being animated. They also note the "crossbar" is actually not in perspective on purpose, which is an interesting design choice as it would mean the logo doesn't scale at all, but has to be re-rendered for every size.

The perspective drawing is based on classical perspective drawing, not computerized perspective. The cross bar stays the same size no matter the height of the logo, which means it has to be redrawn for each time it increases in size, like classic typography.

The crossbar posted on their site actually differs to the one posted by Microsoft which leads me to believe they are already running into the scaling issues already. Will the real Windows 8 logo please stand up.

Here is a Windows logo history from Windows 8 to Windows 1.0:

Windows Logo History (Windows 8 to Windows 1.0)

Windows 1.0

Windows 1.0 Logo

Windows 3.1

Windows 3.1 Logo

Windows XP

Windows XP Logo

Windows Vista

Windows Vista Logo

Windows 8

Windows 8 Logo