RIAA's Report Card Grade Google's Anti-Piracy Policies 'Incomplete'

On December 19, Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) published a Report Card on Google's Anti-Piracy Policies. In the report card and comprehensive evaluation of each of the specific commitments that Google made approximately a year ago, in their new copyright piracy policies and the steps the company committed to undertake, RIAA scold the search […]

RIAA's Report Card Scolds on Google's Anti-Piracy PoliciesOn December 19, Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) published a Report Card on Google's Anti-Piracy Policies.

In the report card and comprehensive evaluation of each of the specific commitments that Google made approximately a year ago, in their new copyright piracy policies and the steps the company committed to undertake, RIAA scold the search company for not following through on its promises to fight piracy.

In the report card issued on Monday, RIAA gives Google an "Incomplete" "Overall grade.

In the report card RIAA admits that "while Google has taken some modest steps to deal with copyright infringement online, the promises made by Google remain unfulfilled. Despite its steps, the simple fact is that Google continues to both (i) receive financial benefits from sites and applications that engage in piracy and (ii) place artificial road blocks in rights holders' efforts to protect their content online, contrary to the DMCA."

RIAA notes that "despite the promise that Google "will prevent terms that are closely associated with piracy from appearing in Autocomplete." Google's Autocomplete search suggestions still shows terms associated with piracy when a user is searching for a piece of music or a movie. For example, when "lady gaga mp3" is typed into the search bar, autocomplete directs a user to choose "lady gaga mp3 free" or "lady gaga mp3 download," results that lead to illegal sites," the report says.

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RIAA wants Google to prioritize legal search results by changing the search algorithm, so that;

"Sites that engage in infringing activity should not appear as the first results when searching for what entertainment content to download or stream. This just leads to more piracy and popularity of the site. Rather, whether a site is authorized or unauthorized to make copyrighted works available to the public should be a significant indicator in determining ranking of the result, with unauthorized sites having lower rankings than authorized sites," RIAA said.

"Google should implement more reasonable, proactive steps to ensure that its ad services (AdSense, AdMob, and DoubleClick) do not place ads on Internet sites or applications that engage in infringement. While Google is improving its procedures to consider infringement notice information provided to it, Google should assure compliance by sites and applications with its terms of service that prohibit engaging in unlawful activity," RIAA said.

Here is the full read-only copy of RIAA's report card: