Google Donates

Earlier this week via Google Gives Back 2011, Google announced shared how they are supporting science museums internationally through charitable gifts. Today, one of those museums, the Science Museum in London, gave details of two forthcoming exhibitions supported by their Google grants.First, a new temporary exhibition celebrating the centenary of the birth of English mathematician, […]

Earlier this week via Google Gives Back 2011, Google announced shared how they are supporting science museums internationally through charitable gifts. Today, one of those museums, the Science Museum in London, gave details of two forthcoming exhibitions supported by their Google grants.

Google donates £550,000 to Bletchley Park, London

First, a new temporary exhibition celebrating the centenary of the birth of English mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and computer scientist "Alan Turing" will open in June 2012, Google revealed.

"Turing formalized the concepts of "algorithm" and "computation" with the Turing machine. The Science Museum's biographical exhibition will examine Turing's inspirational (and tragic) story, using objects (including some which have never been on public display), archive material, interactive exhibits, photographs and quotations."

Second, a "new permanent exhibition which opens in summer 2014. Situated at the heart of the Museum, Making Modern Communications will explore the history of information and communication technologies. It'll tell powerful stories about how these technologies have shaped our world over the last 200 years, showcasing never-before-seen objects and the most advanced multimedia and interpretive techniques," blogged Google.

This week, Google also announced support for educational activities at Bletchley Park, where Turing's code-breaking genius helped shorten the second World War and saved thousands of lives.

Bletchley Park, home to the UK's main effort to intercept and decode enemy communications during the Second World War, was neglected after the end of hostilities, leading to recent fears that much of the site might be condemned and demolished.

Google donated £550,000 to help Bletchley Park kickstart a £15m development project. The Trust needs to come up with £2.4m in matching funding to unlock the grant.

The funds, which come from the Google.org philanthropic arm, will help the Bletchley Park Trust to achieve its goal of unlocking a £4.5m Heritage Lottery Fund grant as it tries to develop the site into a heritage and education center.

The funding will allow the Bletchley Park Trust to restore code breaking huts 1, 3 and 6 which housed the scientists who worked on cracking the codes created by the Nazi Enigma and Lorenz cipher machines, as well as creating a visitor center and exhibition in the currently derelict Block C.