Google Plugin for Eclipse (GPE) Open Sourced Under (EPL) Eclipse Public License v1.0

Google Plugin for Eclipse (GPE) hits a milestone today, as "all of GPE (including GWT Designer) is now open source under the Eclipse Public License (EPL) v1.0," announced a member of Google Web Toolkit."GPE is a set of software development tools that enables Java developers to quickly design, build, optimize, and deploy cloud-based applications using […]

Google Plugin for Eclipse (GPE) LogoGoogle Plugin for Eclipse (GPE) hits a milestone today, as "all of GPE (including GWT Designer) is now open source under the Eclipse Public License (EPL) v1.0," announced a member of Google Web Toolkit.

"GPE is a set of software development tools that enables Java developers to quickly design, build, optimize, and deploy cloud-based applications using the Google Web Toolkit (GWT), Speed Tracer, App Engine, and other Google Cloud services.

Because of the large ecosystem that has developed around GWT, App Engine, and Google's Cloud services, and because our primary mission is to help users (as opposed to creating proprietary development tools), it makes a lot of sense for us to open source GPE and make it easier for the community to enhance and extend the tools," the team member said.

"As of today, all of the code is available directly from the new GPE project and GWT Designer project on Google Code."

Note that "GWT Designer itself is based upon the WindowBuilder open source project at Eclipse.org contributed by Google last year. We will be adopting the same guidelines for contributing code used by the GWT project," said the GWT team member.

"We've many developers using Google's Eclipse plugin to develop GWT-based applications targeting the JBoss Application Server. With the open sourcing of the plugin we're looking forward to working even more closely with the Google team and the rest of the community on making the developer experience even more productive and an integrated part of Eclipse platform. We are especially interested in seeing the Google Eclipse plugins being able to target multiple runtimes such as the JBoss Enterprise Application Platform and Google App Engine in a uniform way, working more seamlessly with standards-based tools and frameworks," said Red Hat's Max Andersen.