Commemorating 10th Anniversary of Windows XP: 'Then and Now ' Infographic

Windows XP just turned 10 years old. While turning 10 is often lauded, in the tech industry it means you're falling behind. 10 years is a long time to have the same old technology.To commemorate its 10 year anniversary and Microsoft also celebrate the anniversary of Windows 7 officially being in market for two years […]

Windows XP just turned 10 years old. While turning 10 is often lauded, in the tech industry it means you're falling behind. 10 years is a long time to have the same old technology.

To commemorate its 10 year anniversary and Microsoft also celebrate the anniversary of Windows 7 officially being in market for two years on Saturday.

In this end, the company has created a infographic to represent the shifts over the last decade.

"While Windows XP was pioneering for its time, it's clear the nature of work has changed and businesses are able to accomplish much more with Windows 7. Like Windows XP, Windows 7 has seen incredible market adoption with more than 30 percent market share, according to Net Applications. The vast majority of enterprise customers got great value with Windows XP and are moving or have plans to move to Windows 7 Enterprise," Microsoft stated.

"Windows XP represented both an amazing and a sad time for me. It came weeks after the 9/11 attacks and was held in New York both as a reminder that the nation would and could go on but we'd lost a co-worker in that earlier tragedy and it was hard to get away from remembering that as well. This was the true beginning of my hobby of building my own desktop computers and XP was a dream to install compared to both the older Windows ME and Windows 2000 offerings. This hobby was one of my passions for most of the last decade. What was particularly memorable was how many people thought few would actually move to this OS given how soon it arrived after Windows 2000 only to find that not only did people move, once moved, didn't want to move to the following versions. Windows XP surprised the market and became Microsoft's most popular OS platform to date. This was also the last OS launch done by Bill Gates personally and my career as an analyst started and was largely made by Bill's launch of Windows 95 a few years earlier. During that time, between 1995 and 2001, some of my fondest memories of Microsoft and meetings with Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer were created and XP represented a turning of the page there as well as Bill began to move on and Steve up to his current role. XP came at a time when Microsoft was at a peak, Apple had yet to turn the corner, and Google was a couple of kids with an interesting idea. We clearly knew then that XP signified and came at a time of change, none of us had any concept for just how massive that change would be."

Here is the infographic: