System Center Configuration Manager 2012 Help You Manage Non-traditional Consumer Devices

Microsoft's upcoming System Center Configuration Manager 2012 will help you enable consumerization of IT. "With ConfigMgr 2012, we wanted to let you consolidate all of your security and configuration management under a "single pane of glass", no matter what types of devices are at the end of the line," informed Jeffrey Sutherland, Lead Program Manager, […]

Microsoft's upcoming System Center Configuration Manager 2012 will help you enable consumerization of IT. "With ConfigMgr 2012, we wanted to let you consolidate all of your security and configuration management under a "single pane of glass", no matter what types of devices are at the end of the line," informed Jeffrey Sutherland, Lead Program Manager, System Center Configuration Manager.

Adding, "Simply specify the connection properties so ConfigMgr can talk to your Exchange 2010 "organization" and begin managing any EAS-connected device directly from ConfigMgr. And it all works whether you have Exchange deployed internally or you're using Office 365."

The features that come with ConfigMgr 2012 for managing non-traditional, "consumer" devices include:

  • "Asset inventory and reporting - ConfigMgr automatically discovers all those devices that have connected through EAS and collects basic inventory, so you can view them directly in the ConfigMgr console, build device collections and queries, and run asset reports. We also have a bunch of reports built-in to help you analyze the use of mobile devices at your company, such as a useful summary report that breaks out the devices by operating system. And we can even automatically associate the devices to the users, so you can pull lists of just the users who are affected by a policy change or whose chosen device may need to be updated to a newer version of its mobile operating system.
  • Settings policy management - Define the default settings policy applied to devices connecting to EAS. Within seconds the policy will be pushed to Exchange and applied to mobile devices the next time they sync. There are close to 50 different policies that may be configured through EAS. Most common, and the most important ones in my humble opinion, are the use of strong PIN, required device encryption and remote wipe. These can ensure that your company's data is reasonably protected regardless of the mobile device choices made by your users.
  • Remote wipe is a critical feature to deal with lost or stolen devices or similar situations. And, if ConfigMgr has the user association information, the end user can self-service this action from the new ConfigMgr Software Catalog (stay tuned for future blogs and demos about the Software Catalog)," Sutherland explains.

Here is ConfigMgr 2012 datasheet: