Microsoft Researchers Explains Kinect-based Object Digitization

In the video, Mickrosoft researchers Minmin Gong and Xin Sun demonstrates that the raw data from Kinect's depth sensors is actually much rougher than as one might have imagined. To produce a smoother and "water-tight" model, they use a process called "Poisson Surface Reconstruction" to process the spatial points into more realistic surfaces.To make the […]

In the video, Mickrosoft researchers Minmin Gong and Xin Sun demonstrates that the raw data from Kinect's depth sensors is actually much rougher than as one might have imagined. To produce a smoother and "water-tight" model, they use a process called "Poisson Surface Reconstruction" to process the spatial points into more realistic surfaces.

To make the algorithm practical for a gaming platform like the XBOX 360 with limited computing power and memory amongst other game code and resources, they were able to optimize the algorithm to reduce 80% of triangles in the 3D mesh with minor change to the resulting shape which cut the process down from 20 seconds to just 2.

"The Kinect-based Object Digitization project enables the creation of 3-D objects based on just a couple of snapshots. Color/depth images of the front and the back of an object are registered quickly in two dimensions, and a GPU-based surface reconstruction results in a smooth 3-D model," reads the description of the video.

The researcher says,

"Working with Xbox Good Science team, we developed a Kinect based solution for scanning 3D object. Our solution only needs two snapshot of the object: a front side color/depth image of the object and a back side color/depth image of the object. A fast 2D registration algorithm is used to register the front side and back side together based on object silhouette.

After that, a GPU-based surface reconstruction algorithm is applied to reconstruct the smooth and water-tight surface from the input data. Our solution is memory efficient and highly optimized for Xbox 360. As a fundamental support function, it has been successfully used in different Kinect Fun Lab applications such as Googly Eyes and Build a Buddy."