Google Celebrates Puppeteer Jim Henson's 75th Birthday With Animated Doodle

Google.com today celebrating 75th birthday of the puppeteer, director and producer Jim Henson, best known as the creator of the Muppets with a special animated doodle."For the next 36 hours, we're honoring Jim's birthday on our homepage with a special doodle created in tandem with The Jim Henson Company," Google said.The doodle features six new […]

Google.com today celebrating 75th birthday of the puppeteer, director and producer Jim Henson, best known as the creator of the Muppets with a special animated doodle.

"For the next 36 hours, we're honoring Jim's birthday on our homepage with a special doodle created in tandem with The Jim Henson Company," Google said.

The doodle features six new Muppet characters, each of which can be controlled by using a mouse / touchpad as if you're the puppeteer.

The character colors and shapes all correspond to where Google's colored letters usually appear. The first blue Muppet appears in place of the blue "G", the second character appears where the red "o" would appear, and so on.

A couple of the Muppets do special actions when you click to activate them. Click the pink man (2nd from left) and move your mouse fast enough to make him dizzy, and you might see his animated action. Or, click the red monster (the letter "e") and get him to look at the green Muppet for a while and you might see a different animation.

The YouTube video above explains how the special Google Doodle came to life, and also makes note that there are some "hidden animations" that you can trigger as you play with the Doodle.

  • If you hold select the green "l" character and have him stare down at the red "e" character on the right, eventually the red character will eat the green character.
  • Also, if you press and hold the first "o" character (or repeatedly click and mouse up), his glasses will flip in the air before landing back on his face.

Brian Henson, Jim's son shared wrote a blog post on official Google blog about his father.

Brian said "He also loved games--card games, board games, all kinds of games. He was one of those rare parents who was always ready to play again. He loved dogs, particularly goofy ones. And he lived for those moments when everyone laughed so hard they couldn't talk. I often walked onto the Muppet set to find everyone just laughing hysterically.

Although he loved family, his work was almost never about "traditional" families. The Muppets were a family--a very diverse one. One of his life philosophies was that we should love people not for their similarities, but for their differences."

Here is the video of the doodle: