BUILD: 'Windows To Go' (Boot Off Windows 8 from USB) Demoed - Bing Brings 'Voice Search' to Xbox

On day 3, at the BUILD conference, Anaheim, Calif., Microsoft showed off "Windows To Go," a Windows 8 feature that enables enterprise administrators to create USB drives containing complete, managed Windows images that users can use to boot and run Windows on any Windows 7 or Windows 8 capable computer.""Windows To Go makes it possible […]

On day 3, at the BUILD conference, Anaheim, Calif., Microsoft showed off "Windows To Go," a Windows 8 feature that enables enterprise administrators to create USB drives containing complete, managed Windows images that users can use to boot and run Windows on any Windows 7 or Windows 8 capable computer."

"Windows To Go makes it possible for employees to use a managed device whether they work from home, a client office or in a free seating environment."

Windows To Go can allow the USB drive to boot up to Windows 8 even on a Windows 7 PC. While pricing has yet to be confirmed by Microsoft, the report claims that it could charge $50 per seat.

The drive can then be plugged into any PC or laptop which will then boot up Windows 8, with all of the person's files intact. The person can resume working on their own files and applications.

"Windows To Go, can use both USB 2.0 and 3.0 with a large 32 GB USB stick recommended. However, a PC that's running off the Windows To Go USB drive won't be able to hibernate. If someone decides to pull out the USB drive from the PC when Windows To Go is running, it will freeze for 60 seconds. If the USB drive is put back in before the 60 seconds is up, the PC will pick up when it left off. If the USB Drive isn't put back within 60 seconds, the Windows To Go version of Windows 8 will shut down," explains Techie Buzz.

You can check out the Windows To Go feature in the video below:

Here's a demo of what happens if you remove a Windows To Go USB drive:

Also, during the BUILD developer conference Day 2 keynote, Server and Tools President Satya Nadella gave several examples how developers can incorporate Bing datasets into their applications development. Bing isn't just about search, but about information made available for third-party applications and services and for software development.

further search, by bringing Bing to Xbox for the the holidays. "We're trying to give the TV a new voice. Your voice", he said. Microsoft plans to greatly increase the amount of content available via Xbox. "It brings a new challenge", he observed. "How are you going to find things?" Microsoft's solution is combining voice commands with Bing search. "You say it, Xbox finds it", he said.

While discussing Xbox, Ballmer said that Microsoft would also start to bring live TV broadcasts to Xbox, beginning during the holidays. I've got to ask: Is it live or is it Xbox?

Ballmer also identified Microsoft's go-forward priorities:

  • Windows centered (hub for all-company strategy)
  • New hardware form factors (PCs and devices)
  • Natural user interfaces (such as Kinect)
  • Cloud (Azure, Office 365, hosted app servers)
  • Enterprise and consumers (consumer innovations filter down to businesses)
  • First-party applications (Microsoft's own software)

He affirmed Microsoft's commitment and hope for Windows Phone. Ballmer acknowledged that first-year sales weren't what he would have hoped. But he praised the software's advance from version 1 to 2. (Isn't it really 1.5?) Ballmer emphasized the importance of bringing Nokia to Windows Phone as a dedicated hardware partner.