Microsoft Tips To U.S. Teens & Parents On 'Good Digital Citizenship'

In an effort to create a culture of "good digital citizens," Microsoft released two new whitepapers: a whitepaper titled "Fostering Digital Citizenship" and a Teen Reputation Guide" to helping youth, teens, parents and caregivers think about their online reputations, announced noted Kim Sanchez, Director, Trustworthy Computing Communications, Microsof.The guide notes a series of tips, including:If […]

In an effort to create a culture of "good digital citizens," Microsoft released two new whitepapers: a whitepaper titled "Fostering Digital Citizenship" and a Teen Reputation Guide" to helping youth, teens, parents and caregivers think about their online reputations, announced noted Kim Sanchez, Director, Trustworthy Computing Communications, Microsof.

The guide notes a series of tips, including:

  1. If you wouldn't wear it, Don't share it!
  2. Don't use technology as a weapon. Really angry? Walk away from the keyboard.
  3. Know what the Internet is telling people about you. Regularly search yourself online.
  4. Create strong passwords, change them often, and don't share them with friends.

Scanchez noted that "A new Microsoft study shows that before posting personal information online, more than half of U.S. teens and parents don't truly consider the potential consequences of their actions."

While, another, "recent Microsoft survey found that 79 percent of hiring U.S. managers and job recruiters routinely review online reputational information when considering job applicants. All of the sudden, that photo of you partying hardy or playing a practical joke on a friend may not be so funny," said Sanchez.

In addition to research, reputation guide and whitepaper the Redmond company recently created three infographics, depicting how teens spend their time online, as well as an "at school" Internet safety tip card.

You can download, "Fostering Digital Citizenship" here, and the Teen Reputation Guide here.