Future Tech: Toyota Window to the World and Dassault Systems Aeon - Plus Microsoft's Home of the Future is Living the Dream

Here are the two videos that show simulations of ideas that are currently being developed: the Toyota Window to the World project and the Dassault Systems Aeon Project. Both videos are as remarkable for the utter seamless simplicity of the touch-screen interactions as they are for the imaginative vision of the system.Toyota's Window to the […]

Here are the two videos that show simulations of ideas that are currently being developed: the Toyota Window to the World project and the Dassault Systems Aeon Project. Both videos are as remarkable for the utter seamless simplicity of the touch-screen interactions as they are for the imaginative vision of the system.

Toyota's Window to the World is a joint effort of Toyota Motor Europe's Kansei1 Design Division and the consultancy arm of the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design. The video shows a girl using a passenger-window touch screen to draw objects that stay attached to where she placed them, find out the distance of particular objects from her, see and hear the names of things in view in the language of the area of travel, and zoom in on details. The sheep at the end is a particularly charming touch. Prototypes were on display at the "Our Future Mobility Now" exhibition in Brussels this summer, but there's no word yet on when the final version might make it into cars.

The Aeon Project video shows the driver/passenger in an automated car using a touch screen to choose virtual icons. He gets navigation information, finds out more about the area he's driving through, or chooses among virtual reality options that let him focus on entertainment rather than the road. It's up to him whether to stay grounded in the (imagined) here and now.

And, in the related tech features, watch the following Microsoft's Home of the Future is Living the Dream video:

"No place speaks to that result more than the Microsoft Home - a glimpse into what a living space may look like in the future. The idea behind the creation of the Home came from Craig Mundie, Microsoft's chief research and strategy officer. Since its inception in 1994, the Home has been visited by hundreds of thousands of people, including presidents, company partners, and celebrities.

Because of zoning and capacity constraints, the Home is closed to the public, but I thought it would be great to let you have a look for yourself."