Eyeborg Man Rob Spence Fits Video Camera Into Prosthetic Eye

Rob Spence, a film-maker who lost his eye during a shooting accident as a child has turned his prosthetic one into a video camera. Spence told Sky News the technology is like something you would usually only see in films and as a result he got backing from experts in the field.According to Spence, technology […]

Rob Spence, a film-maker who lost his eye during a shooting accident as a child has turned his prosthetic one into a video camera. Spence told Sky News the technology is like something you would usually only see in films and as a result he got backing from experts in the field.

According to Spence, technology is already advanced and the possibilities are endless in the future. He said: "People are going to have the option of having superior arms, superior eyes at some point.

"People say no one would ever cut off their own arm and replace it, but if the technology gets there - and it looks like it will - people will think about it. "They might be early adopters."

Spence told Sky News that "It wasn't easy but because it's so like (science) fiction, engineers had a lot of fun making it." "I was able to do it without a budget - it was a fun project for these guys."

The technology used is the same as in a wireless lapel microphone with a transmitter and receiver.

However, the wireless transmits a video signal rather than a sound signal from the tiny camera inside Rob's prosthetic eye.

The device is not connected to his brain and hasn't restored his vision. But it records everything he sees, sending what he's looking at in real time to a computer.