How Google Building A Healthier, Greener Googleplex

Anthony Ravitz, Green Team Lead, Real Estate & Workplace Services, today made a blog post about the Green culture at Googleplex.Ravitz said that "When it comes to greening our office buildings -- we want to create the healthiest work environments possible where Googlers can thrive and innovate. From concept through design, construction and operations, we […]

Anthony Ravitz, Green Team Lead, Real Estate & Workplace Services, today made a blog post about the Green culture at Googleplex.

Ravitz said that "When it comes to greening our office buildings -- we want to create the healthiest work environments possible where Googlers can thrive and innovate. From concept through design, construction and operations, we create buildings that function like living and breathing systems by optimizing access to nature, clean air and daylight."

Per Ravitz post:

"We avoid materials that contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other known toxins that may harm human health, so Googlers don't have to worry about the air they're breathing or the toxicity of the furniture, carpet or other materials in their workspaces. We also use dual stage air filtration systems to eliminate particulates and remaining VOCs, which further improves indoor air quality.

In North America, we purchase materials free of the Living Building Challenge Red List Materials and EPA Chemicals of Concern, and through the Pharos Project we ask our suppliers to meet strict transparency requirements.

Google involved installing the first solar panels on campus back in 2007.

We use Google Apps to help us track progress toward our goals--which meet or exceed the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED standards--and share what we've learned among our global facilities teams.

We're proud of our latest LEED Platinum achievement for the interior renovation of an office building at the Googleplex. While we have other LEED Platinum buildings in our portfolio, it's a first for our headquarters and a first for the City of Mountain View. The interior renovation was designed by Boora Architects and built by XL Construction, using healthy building materials and practices. In fact, we now have more than 4.5 million square feet of building space around the world on deck to earn LEED Certification.

[Source:Google blog]