Messages for Japan Hits 30,000 Messages - Tanabata in Sendai

In April, after this spring's devastating earthquake in Japan, Google crisis team created a site dubbed "messagesforjapan.com" where people from around the world could submit messages of hope in their own languages and have them automatically translated into Japanese. Today, Arielle Reinstein, Product Marketing Manager, announced that "nearly 30,000 messages have been posted so far."Also, […]

In April, after this spring's devastating earthquake in Japan, Google crisis team created a site dubbed "messagesforjapan.com" where people from around the world could submit messages of hope in their own languages and have them automatically translated into Japanese. Today, Arielle Reinstein, Product Marketing Manager, announced that "nearly 30,000 messages have been posted so far."

Also, this past weekend marked the celebration of "Tanabata in Sendai," the largest city in the disaster area and home to one of the most famous festivals in the country. People often celebrate Tanabata, which means "Evening of the Seventh," by writing wishes on tanzaku (small strips of paper) and hanging them on bamboo branches. This year, these paper strips displayed some of the messages of hope submitted through the site, and festival participants added their own messages to those from around the world.

The team has now updated messagesforjapan.com that now let you see photos of people gathering for Tanabata in Sendai--reading, creating and hanging messages in the area surrounding the disaster earlier this year. See the embedd under this post.

Here's the messageforjapan.com live:

[Source: Google blog]