Intel Talks "21 mm Thick, 5 Hours Battery Backup" Ultrabooks

The world of computing is in the midst of a sea change. Some might call it a "strategic inflection point." You can see it all around, especially in the massive growth of device types -- smartphones, tablets, hybrid devices, e-readers, netbooks, Chromebooks.This week Intel revealed more about its thoughts about the "Ultrabooks" project. The new […]

The world of computing is in the midst of a sea change. Some might call it a "strategic inflection point." You can see it all around, especially in the massive growth of device types -- smartphones, tablets, hybrid devices, e-readers, netbooks, Chromebooks.This week Intel revealed more about its thoughts about the "Ultrabooks" project. The new product was supposed to be an answer for Apple's popular MacBook Air notebook.

In a blog post dated July 28, Becky Emmett said, "This new breed of devices will combine best in class performance, responsiveness and security in thin and light, elegant form factors. Eventually you'll think of an Ultrabook as a tablet when you want it, a PC when you need it." "They will impact the physical shape and capabilities of personal computing devices and require substantial changes to the way Intel and its partners design, produce and market devices and their components," added Emmett.

Intel President and CEO Paul Otellini in a most recent earnings announcement said that he's pleased with the industry response and customer commitments around this new product category.

Sean and Mooly explained that Ultrabooks will arrive in phases. "Phase 1 was kicked off when Intel introduced its latest Ultra-Low Voltage 2nd Generation Intel Core processors in June that will bring new systems to shelves this holiday season." And, Phase 2 centers around the next generation Intel microarchitecture code name Ivy Bridge processors scheduled for availability in systems in the first half of 2012."

Laptops based on Ivy Bridge will bring improved power efficiency, smart visual performance, increased responsiveness and enhanced security. Faster I/O such as USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt technologies are also part of Intel's ongoing work to drive the PC platform forward.

Emmett said, "Intel microarchitecture code name Haswell is the third phase toward accelerating the Ultrabook and reinventing the capabilities of the laptop in ultra thin and light, responsive and secure designs."

"Ultrabook design is supposed to be both light and thin with Emmett stating that it is designed to be "less than 21 mm thick - some much thinner than even that." The design is also supposed to have a long battery life, between 5 to 8 hours, along with being able to start up quickly," this is all that coming up in 2011.

Emmett adds, "We are totally jazzed about all of this. It's a good time to be working in this industry and it's awesome time to be working at Intel. It's also a fantastic time to be a user of technology - never before have we had so many choices of devices to suit our personal needs and lifestyles. If you think today's variety of computing devices is exciting, you ain't seen nothing yet."

[Source: Intel]