Acceptance Criteria for 3D Buildings in Google Earth Updates

Google SketchUp just gave an overhaul to their Acceptance Criteria. "Our new Acceptance Criteria have been completely rewritten with the goal of making them clearer and easier to follow. Issues relating to photo textures, permanence of structures, splitting, and entourage have proven to be the most common areas of confusion in the past," informs Jordan […]

Google SketchUp just gave an overhaul to their Acceptance Criteria. "Our new Acceptance Criteria have been completely rewritten with the goal of making them clearer and easier to follow. Issues relating to photo textures, permanence of structures, splitting, and entourage have proven to be the most common areas of confusion in the past," informs Jordan Van Wyk, 3D Modeling Specialist.

Note: If, after "reviewing Acceptance Criteria, you feel we've made the wrong decision, use the "Tell us why we're wrong" link (at the bottom of the model's 3D Warehouse page) to ask us to take another look. You're encouraged to include links to photos of the actual building or other online resources to will help us to understand your point of view," Van Wyk added.

Here're the changes:

Photo Textures are now only required on upward facing surfaces of the model and on the main facade. Any remaining, non-photo-textured faces in your model should be painted with realistic-looking textures that match the color and look of the building in real life.


Beginning today, only Permanent Structures will be accepted.


Model Splitting: All submitted models should contain only one structure each. Each structure should be uploaded as a separate model file. This includes properties that've multiple buildings on them such as a house and a shed or garage. If buildings are all connected in a city block, they should be split into separate models based on building type, function or address.

Entourage: All models of trees and other permanent entourage (such as signs, light posts and benches) to be uploaded separately from the buildings with which they may be associated. Also, multiple, related trees and other entourage objects can be grouped into a single model as long as they're located in a relatively concentrated area. Means a single model can contain all the trees for a block or a park, but it shouldn't contain all the trees for multiple blocks or an entire city.


Other improvements: If a model you submit isn't accepted, you'll receive an email notification (opt into these emails via your preferences) that includes a direct link to concrete information about how you can improve it before you re-submit.

What about models that have already been accepted? Van Wyk said, "If your model has already been accepted, it'll stay in the 3D Buildings layer until and unless it's sent through the evaluation process again." However, following actions can cause a model to re-enter this process:

  1. You make an edit to your model and re-upload it to the 3D Warehouse, replacing the previous version.
  2. Someone else submits a model in the same location as your model.
  3. Periodic terrain and aerial imagery updates cause your model to go through our automated alignment process.
  4. Someone clicks the "Report a problem" link for your model in Google Earth.

[Source: Google SketchUp blog]