Twitter Adds "Possibly Sensitive" Field to Tweets with NSFW Contents

Beginning today, July 28, you may notice a new boolean field in API responses & streams containing tweets: "possibly_sensitive" in its streaming API, in a test that will eventually result in more granular end-user media settings for Twitter, Twitter has just announced to developers."This new field will only surface when a tweet contains a link. […]

Beginning today, July 28, you may notice a new boolean field in API responses & streams containing tweets: "possibly_sensitive" in its streaming API, in a test that will eventually result in more granular end-user media settings for Twitter, Twitter has just announced to developers.

"This new field will only surface when a tweet contains a link. The meaning of the field doesn't pertain to the tweet content itself, but instead it is an indicator that the URL contained in the tweet may contain content or media identified as sensitive content. During this initial testing phase, there's nothing you need to do with this field and the field values cannot be relied on for accuracy. In the future, we'll have a family of additional API methods & fields for handling end-user "media settings" and possibly sensitive content," informs Twitter.

"This API change means that eventually when users flag their own or other users' content as possibly sensitive, a warning will show up before in the media details pane of the tweet informing other users of the flagged content before they click-through. While the ability to flag content as sensitive has existed since Twitter launched Photos, the "sensitive content" flag on the details pane is new," Twitter representative Carolyn Penner says to TechCruch.

Penner said that the "sensitive content field will pertain to all photos and video links in tweets including those from Instagram, Twitpic and Pic.Twitter.com. "We want to make sure that users are having a good photos experience, while giving them control over what they're going to see," says Penner on the decision to add the new designation."

If you're curious how this field will ultimately be used, you may read the following user support articles:

[Source: Twitter Developers]